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  • LIFESTYLE

    The oodles of takes on noodles

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 02/04/2017

    » In their most popular forms kuay tio -- rice noodles -- are prepared in two ways. As kuay tio nam they are served in broth, and there are countless variants on this basic noodle soup. The other approach is to stir-fry the noodles in a wok to make phat kuay tio, and here again there is a long list of different fried noodles no less irresistible to noodle lovers as the repertoire of kuay tio nam.

  • LIFESTYLE

    A sweet sausage for all seasons

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 26/03/2017

    » When it gets to mealtime and you want to cook up something for yourself that is easy to prepare and won't take too much time, the first thing you probably do is look in the refrigerator to see what is there.

  • LIFESTYLE

    What's cooking for breakfast?

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 08/01/2017

    » Everyone knows that breakfast is an important meal, but when looked at closely, it is as loaded with cultural significance as it is with vitamins and nutrients to fuel the coming day. It can provide a wealth of detailed information on the local environment, on the historical era in which it is or was eaten, the kind of work done by and the social status of the family who prepare and eat it, and the prevailing awareness of the relationship between food and good health.

  • LIFESTYLE

    A culinary melting pot

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 28/08/2016

    » Think of a favourite dish and then consider the various ingredients that come together to make it. You'll see that they are drawn from many different sources, some of them borrowed from other culinary traditions. One good example is pad Thai. Almost everything that goes into it is Chinese, from the small-gauge rice noodles to the tofu, beansprouts, hua chai po (Chinese turnip), Chinese leeks, dried shrimp, peanuts and even the duck eggs (in the past, ducks in Thailand were raised by Chinese). In terms of its ingredients, this familiar dish is Chinese from top to bottom, although whether it was a Thai or a Chinese cook who first prepared it, I don't know.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Cracking duck eggs' appeal

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 31/07/2016

    » If you compare a duck's egg with a hen's egg, which one comes out on top? The right answer is that each one has its strong points. Most people prefer hen eggs, however, and it is easy to find them for sale in any fresh market or supermarket where they are bought in much greater amounts than duck eggs. Cooked-to-order food shops don't keep duck eggs at the ready for customers, who are very unlikely to ask for them.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Souped up broth best served hot

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 27/12/2015

    » When you eat a meal in China, there will probably be an array of different dishes on the table. One thing that can never be missing, however, is some kind of dish with a broth. Here, you have to be careful to avoid being scalded. Dishes hot from the stove usually have steam rising up from them, but the broth in Chinese dishes gives no such warning. These foods appear cool and harmless, but if you aren't careful you'll leave the table with your tongue fully cooked.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Wake up and smell the coffee

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 14/09/2014

    » There is no way to know how much coffee the people of Thailand drink in the course of a day. In the future, when the population grows even bigger, they are bound to consume even more. Thais and coffee are inseparably bound, and it isn't only the taste that has hooked them. One of the pleasures of Thai life is to meet up with friends in a coffee shop and relax over a steaming cupful.

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