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  • LIFESTYLE

    The more things change ...

    Brunch, Andrew Biggs, Published on 07/04/2019

    » My Thai experience is bookended with two memorable explanations of impolite English phrases. The first was 30 years ago; the second this week.

  • LIFESTYLE

    James' lucky break, Tim stakes claim, stork brings twins

    News, Mae Moo, Published on 07/04/2019

    » Actor James Ma says he still saw an opportunity to serve the nation as a conscripted soldier after learning he was the beneficiary of extraordinary good luck at his local conscription station last week.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Slippery knowledge

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 07/04/2019

    » The cooking-oil industry is like an ongoing battle between various types of oils -- palm, soybean, corn, sunflower, rice-bran, canola and olive. Getting more and more serious every day, the oil war doesn't seem to have a winner or loser when it comes to benefits. Each has its own scientific studies and research as reference to underline advantages or otherwise.

  • LIFESTYLE

    J-pop gone rogue

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 07/04/2019

    » Anyone who's been to Japan (or spent a decent amount of time on the internet) would have probably come across T-shirts with puzzling or badly translated English. Perusing CHAI's pastel-hued website gives you a similar experience except that everything actually makes sense -- "We Are New Exciting Onna (female) Band From Japan! NEO KAWAII ! COMPLEX IS ART!," its meta description announces. A click and a quick scroll down also give you an overview on the group's "NEO KAWAII" ethos, which essentially goes against any notions of the classic kawaii ("You don't need to have big eyes or have skinny legs to be KAWAII! There should be many more types of KAWAII, and everyone is KAWAII in her own way … Our insecurities make us who we are. The insecurities become art. KAWAII is a never-ending journey!").

  • LIFESTYLE

    Hungarian Roma designer fights stereotypes with fashion

    AFP, Published on 07/04/2019

    » BUDAPEST: Hungarian Roma fashion designer Erika Varga says her label is about stitching together cultural traditions and snipping through stereotypes as much as it's about dressmaking.

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