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  • LIFESTYLE

    And There's More

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 19/05/2019

    » Behind the moniker MorMor stands a Toronto native named Seth Nyquist. The 25-year-old singer-songwriter only started churning out music last year and his name is already on everyone's lips. This is mostly due to the strength of his debut EP Heaven's Only Wishful, a nifty self-produced collection of five songs boasting the lush bedroom pop DNA and the sultry sophistication of R&B and disco. Clocking in just under half-an-hour, the EP managed to showcase Nyquist's knack for seamlessly blending genres and creating the sound and narratives which are entirely his own.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Cut above the rest

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 12/05/2019

    » We first heard the name Cut The Crab back in 2014 when their single Mai Mee Kam Tob (Without Doubt) was featured in the Future Sound Of Bangkok's envelope-pushing debut compilation. Besides being one of the most forward-thinking records of that year, the compilation also gave us a sample of what local talents were capable of. Along with eclectic artists ranging from DCNXTR and Gramaphone Children (Jaree Thanapura) to Nolens.Volens. and Plastic Section, Cut The Crab stood out among the gifted bunch as a highly promising newcomer with a keen ear for electro-pop brilliance. Even though the band hasn't been exactly prolific over the past few years, the trio-turned-duo are now back at it with the release of their self-titled debut EP, a six-track collection that's been nearly half a decade in the making.

  • LIFESTYLE

    When sleaze gets slick

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 05/05/2019

    » Fat White Family, for the uninitiated, are a South London group trading in all manners of classic punk depravities, rock'n'roll drug habits and songs with imaginatively risqué titles (Cream Of The Young, Is It Raining In Your Mouth?, Bomb Disneyland). Led by founding frontman Lias Saoudi, the band is notorious for their outrageous live gigs, where shocking antics and nudity are not uncommon. As a band, this collective transgression is the unique selling point upon which their 2013 debut album Champagne Holocaust and its follow-up Songs For Our Mothers hinged. It's also the very factor that contributed to "the sort of classic stereotypical drug meltdown", as Lias puts it in his recent interview with Noisey, which led to them getting dropped by US-based Fat Possum Records.

  • LIFESTYLE

    In for the kill

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 28/04/2019

    » From debuting on CBS's The Late Show With Stephen Colbert to being the first K-pop group to perform at this year's Coachella, BLACKPINK are unstoppable in their quest for global pop domination, which is the ultimate goal that lies at the heart of South Korea's ongoing cultural export scheme. Like their label mates Big Bang and 2NE1, the Seoul-based quartet is meticulously designed by industry behemoth YG Entertainment. But what really sets BLACKPINK apart from their peers is their collective cosmopolitan edge -- Jisoo representing Korea, Lisa bringing the spicy Thai flavours and New Zealand-born, Australia-raised Rosé and New Zealand-raised Jennie completing the picture with their multicultural upbringing. Singing and rapping in Korean, Japanese and English, they're probably the first all-female idol group to have amassed an army of fans, endearingly known as "blinks", not only from Asia, but also North America and elsewhere, in just a few years.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Giddy up, boy

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 14/04/2019

    » On Mitski's latest album Be The Cowboy, the cowboy image that's classically reserved for American white males is, even though for a fleeting moment, suspended and transferred to the Japanese-American singer-songwriter. According to Mitski, this is part of her mantra, "be the cowboy you wish to see in the world", a joke with herself that she uses to combat feelings of imposter syndrome. Though meant as a joke, it's a kind of joke that digs deep into the firmly rooted notions of masculinity, race and femininity.

  • LIFESTYLE

    J-pop gone rogue

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 07/04/2019

    » Anyone who's been to Japan (or spent a decent amount of time on the internet) would have probably come across T-shirts with puzzling or badly translated English. Perusing CHAI's pastel-hued website gives you a similar experience except that everything actually makes sense -- "We Are New Exciting Onna (female) Band From Japan! NEO KAWAII ! COMPLEX IS ART!," its meta description announces. A click and a quick scroll down also give you an overview on the group's "NEO KAWAII" ethos, which essentially goes against any notions of the classic kawaii ("You don't need to have big eyes or have skinny legs to be KAWAII! There should be many more types of KAWAII, and everyone is KAWAII in her own way … Our insecurities make us who we are. The insecurities become art. KAWAII is a never-ending journey!").

  • LIFESTYLE

    Returning to form

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 31/03/2019

    » It's hard to believe it's been nearly two decades since Ladytron unleashed its own version of electropop to the world. Hailing from Liverpool, the quartet of Helen Marnie, Mira Aroyo, Daniel Hunt and Reuben Wu first introduced themselves with their 2001 debut 604, a solid 16-track collection heavily influenced by the likes of Kraftwerk, New Order and Depeche Mode. In a period when the UK charts sounded a little uninspired (the No.1 singles ranged from JLo's Love Don't Cost A Thing to Limp Bizkit's Rollin' to Afroman's Because I Got High -- you get the idea), Ladytron's simmering cauldron of synth-pop and electro-industrial almost felt like an act of rebellion.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Anthems for the end of the world

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 24/03/2019

    » If you happen to recall the indie explosion that came and went during the mid-noughties, you're most likely to recall how UK math-rockers Foals were perched right on the forefront alongside the now-nowhere-to-be-found groups like Kasabian, Hard-Fi and Maxïmo Park. Although not the first band to come up with it, they're largely responsible for spreading the gospel of that intricate, tightly-wound guitar work that's gone on to more or less define the genre. Over time, the Foals' signature hectic romp that was the backbone of their 2008 landmark debut, Antidotes, has transformed into something a little more polished and more mature. Subtle sonic shifts can already be detected on their second LP, Total Life Forever (how much of a revelation is Spanish Sahara?), and even more so on the subsequent records, the unabashedly potent Holy Fire and What Went Down.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Footloose and fancy-free

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 17/03/2019

    » Over the past decade, Beirut's Zach Condon has been a go-to guy for what I like to refer to as "speciality indie rock". This is just a fancy way of saying that the music is unlike your typical indie sound. Beirut are masters when it comes to injecting world music elements into their repertoire, which has accumulated into a sizeable discography since their 2006 debut Gulag Orkestar. And although the boys may have faltered somewhat with previous effort No No No, they're back stronger than ever with their latest, Gallipoli.

  • LIFESTYLE

    James Blake's Changing Form

    Brunch, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 10/03/2019

    » "Now I'm confiding, know I may have/ Gone through the motions my whole life/ I hope this is the first day/ That I connect motion to feeling," James Blake wears his heart on his sleeve on the piano-driven opener/title track of his fourth studio album, Assume Form. The candid openness with which Blake addresses depression and anxiety, the struggles he's confessed of having since his 2011 debut album took off, is stunning to witness especially for an artist whose career is mostly built on nuances, abstraction and negative spaces.

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