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  • LIFESTYLE

    With Grace, Cannes Film Festival opens tonight

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » From the woes of Princess Grace to weird limo sex, from a Saint Laurent biopic to a 3D envelope-pusher, the 67th Cannes Film Festival rolls out its enviably red carpet tonight in an annual cinema bash that sees the world’s brand-name directors unveiling their latest offerings. The Nicole Kidman-starring Grace Of Monaco, by director Olivier Dahan (La Vie En Rose), will open the 10-day festival to the usual surfeit of glitz, before the gladiatorial ring of European-heavy filmmakers take turns to gauge the pulse of cinema art through their fine (and not so fine) movies.

  • LIFESTYLE

    A graceful yet shallow opening

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » Australian actresses seem to like playing European royals, but often make a hash of it. Last year it was Naomi Watts as Princess Diana, in a supposedly tragic biopic that unfortunately inspired jokes and posthumous dread. This week in the sunny Riviera, merely miles away from the picturesque and sometimes boring Monaco, we’ve had Nicole Kidman in the title role in Grace Of Monaco, the curtain-raiser of the 67th Cannes Film Festival. It’s a film that continues the tradition that, as critics and insiders speak of Cannes as the world’s most important movie gathering, the maxim almost always excludes the opening film.

  • NEWS

    Of Grace and Timbuktu

    Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » The bomb dropped pretty early: Grace of Monaco opened the 67th Cannes Film Festival on May 14 to a collective howl of international critics.

  • OPINION

    We're in the news, and it's not all okay

    News, Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » ‘So what’s happening in your country?”

  • LIFESTYLE

    Female woes still centre at Cannes

    Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » Thankfully we’ve put Grace’s distress behind us (see previous post), but the woes of European women remained a subject of scrutiny on the second day in Cannes.

  • NEWS

    Winter Sleep, Saint Laurent

    Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » A tortured soul who cuts exquisite clothes hits the main Cannes screen, to our supreme delight. "<i>Saint Laurent</i>", a biopic of the French couturier that was premiered here Saturday, floats into the festival with intelligence and sensual poise. It's remarkable that the director, Bertrand Bonello, manages to avoid most of the cliches about a depressed genius despite the familiar arc of the story, meanwhile Gaspard Ulliel, playing the title role, makes Yves a champagne flute that's as fragile as it is unbreakable. The good news is that the film already has a Thai distribution; so just wait for the release date, hopefully soon.

  • NEWS

    The hypnotic magnificence of "Jauja"

    Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » The fifth day of the 67th Cannes Film Festival turned out to be the richest. No, not because of the much-anticipated "<i>Maps to the Stars</i>", a clammy Hollywood satire by David Cronenberg featuring joyless limo sex between Julianne Moore and Robert Pattinson — God bless California. The riches, instead, came from a small Argentinean film "Jauja" by Lisandro Alonso, who’s now confirmed his place in the rank of cinema visionaries. I seriously hope that one of the film festivals in Thailand would bring this gem to our shores, because the hypnotic magnificence and Patagonian inferno of "<i>Jauja</i>" only works best on the cinema screen.

  • NEWS

    Cannes so far

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » Women vs Nature

  • LIFESTYLE

    A place in history

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » When people ask why Cannes Film Festival is important, one way to answer that is to look at a film such as Adieu Au Langage (Goodbye To Language). Jean-Luc Godard, 84, is the oldest filmmaker in this year’s competition, and with this latest movie he turns out to be the most exciting. Fifty years ago Godard and friends, under the watch of theorist Andre Bazin, waged a ferocious war to prove that cinema is art and filmmakers are artists, that they worked and thought like Picasso or Balzac or Rodin did. Godard and Co won that battle, but he’s still far from finished — simply because cinema is far from finished. In other words, film is part of art history, and history is being written all the time, sometimes, prominently, at places like Cannes.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Diamond is the future

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 04/01/2015

    » The closest thing to Thailand in Cannes this year is, once again, Cambodia. Last year, Rithy Panh arrived at the festival with moving Khmer Rouge documentary The Missing Picture, which went on to win the Un Certain Regard prize and be nominated for an Oscar. This year, at the sidebar Directors’ Fortnight section, Paris-based Davy Chou presents his 21-minute film Cambodia 2099, a rapt, fluid record of the dreams-in-construction that is present-day Phnom Penh.

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