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    Learning about Thai ladies in marriage and culture

    By Anonymous, Created on: 23/08/2003, Last updated on: 21/10/2007

    » I would like to learn about the Thai lady in marriage and the Thai culture. The reason for this, is that after literally travelling the world for many years, during work commitments, and meeting along the way many ladies for serious relationships. I met along the way a lady from Thailand. We met many...

    • Anonymous commented : e without having to boil some water.

    • 27 replies, 16,641 views

    Forum

    getting divorced my mail.

    By Anonymous, Created on: 13/06/2004, Last updated on: 22/01/2008

    » I am Thai woman. I got married American about 1 and half years ago in Thailand. Now I want to get divorced and he doesn't want to fly here to give me divorced. He would like me to send him money for the ticket, hotel and food for a week in Thailand. And that will cost me alot of money. I have talked...

    • Anonymous commented : ur heads and everyone pouring water over our hands.) This lasted about 4 hours in the early morning until 1100. The wedding party in the evening attended by 350 people was also paid for out of this bride price. The remaining money was used by the family to rebuilt the houe and enlatrge the family noodle business. I was very happy with this. I also paid for three family members to come over from Wales. I bought a house on a mortgage and paid deposit on a new car. I thought all of this was very reasonable to set up life for my own family. In the four years since my Thai family has been very supportive and help looking after our two kids. i certainly don't feel like any one got ripped off. all the best Dave

    • Anonymous commented : monks will eat and give holly water than leave by noon. They will invite 5, 7, 9 monks. It would depend on the availability of monks in the area and or the status of her family. You will have to pay someone to drive them over to her house. They would make gifts (usually household items) for each monks with money donation too. Each guest or each family will make about 1,000 baht gift or more, or they may bring other none monetary gifts. It would depend on their relationships with your fiance's family. I would not bring him 100,000 in cash. You need to give him bank cashier check and make a enlarge copy to show at the wedding reception. You can make a color copy at Kinko at 8 x 12 or larger. You can bring about $5,000 in $100 denomination. You can open an account with ATM card at Bank of America in Bangkok, so that you could manage the account while you are in USA also. This would be your spending account in Thailand. You can withdraw in Thai baht at the ATM machine to pay for wedding expenses. There is no need to rent wedding clothes. It is ok for you to get marry in other than black western suit and tie. She needs to custom make her traditional Thai silk dresses. NO, I would not give them anymore money. Since it is appeared that they will keep this money. If they are going to rebuild their house, than you could offer to help since you will be living their sometimes. If she is able to work in USA, she could sent them money later. Or she can give them some of her allowance.

    • 21 replies, 11,466 views

    Forum

    Solar Power

    By Anonymous, Created on: 29/03/2005, Last updated on: 31/03/2015

    » I dont understand why Thailand is not using the sun which is there 365 days/year. Can anybody tell me ? I am in the process of building a house but when it comes to solar energy i might have to import myself to only then be confronted with a high import tax on such products. And that while closing...

    • Anonymous commented : house here to have solar hot water. My first apartment in BKK didn't have hot water either but I'll guarantee you that in winter here (Sydney) only the very hardiest individual would take a cold shower! Tom, I have no axe to grind here and I'm certainly not trying to champion one technology over another. However, what's clear to me is that we need to get real about both global warming and the fact that oil supply is only ever going to diminish in future. To me, these are the biggest problems we face and should be accorded governmental priority accordingly. For a variety of reasons I don't see that happening. Maybe we need to wait until our reefs are bleached, Cane Toads hop around Martin Place like they do already in Brisbane, and fuel has reached $200/barrel for the penny to drop! What a shame. Kind regards David

    • Anonymous commented : f Global House and find solar water heaters, at last you get hot water for your shower without using an electric heater. Not seen any direct solar elecric cells yet though myself.

    • drake commented : ar (building) designs and hot water heating, solar takes up too much money and space for what part time power it provides. The mirrors or panels must be constantly cleaned or the efficiency degrades. Doesn't work when it's cloudy, doesn't work when it rains or snow, or blowing sand/dust. It's expensive to start up and ROI takes 20 years or more, often times never. Great for places with a lot of unusable space and not much cloud, rain, or sand/dust storm. Not that I don't like the technology or anything. I'm just saying that solar has inherent issues that may never be resolved no matter how much tax money is thrown at it. One spring weekend 2 years ago I went to Doi Chieng Dao. A beautiful place with the view of an entire valley below, trees a blooming, flowers everywhere. There was a small solar array feeding a battery bank and inverter to power the park facility at the top. At this elevation, the fog often envelopes everything until noon. We pitched our tents and, after dinner, all of us were having a rather pleasant evening snoring away until.... at Zero effing dark hundred, in the dead silence of the effing night, the god effing loud enough to wake the effing dead '[i:aa94gqii]battery bank voltage is low[/i:aa94gqii]' alarm went off and stayed on until someone shut it off around 8 AM. Good thing I took my iPod along. Nobody else got any sleep however.

    • KelvinSim commented : ar (building) designs and hot water heating, solar takes up too much money and space for what part time power it provides. The mirrors or panels must be constantly cleaned or the efficiency degrades. Doesn't work when it's cloudy, doesn't work when it rains or snow, or blowing sand/dust. It's expensive to start up and ROI takes 20 years or more, often times never. Great for places with a lot of unusable space and not much cloud, rain, or sand/dust storm. Not that I don't like the technology or anything. I'm just saying that [url=http://www.shinesolar.net:3cwdnfyu][color=#000000:3cwdnfyu]solar panels[/color:3cwdnfyu][/url:3cwdnfyu] has inherent issues that may never be resolved no matter how much tax money is thrown at it. One spring weekend 2 years ago I went to Doi Chieng Dao. A beautiful place with the view of an entire valley below, trees a blooming, flowers everywhere. There was a small solar array feeding a battery bank and inverter to power the park facility at the top. At this elevation, the fog often envelopes everything until noon. We pitched our tents and, after dinner, all of us were having a rather pleasant evening snoring away until.... at Zero effing dark hundred, in the dead silence of the effing night, the god effing loud enough to wake the effing dead '[i:3cwdnfyu]battery bank voltage is low[/i:3cwdnfyu]' alarm went off and stayed on until someone shut it off around 8 AM. Good thing I took my iPod along. Nobody else got any sleep however.[/u:3cwdnfyu][/quote:3cwdnfyu] Solar panels are not easy to operate.. With increased taxes and rate of installation it has turned out to be an expensive option..

    • Anonymous commented : op of the list would be solar water heating. Not a panacea for sure but something that can be rolled out from TOMORROW to all new homes. This will only help. Further down the road on our drive back to Sydney we passed through the upper Hunter Valley, where many of our coal-powered electricity stations are based. Now I'm no scientist but it suddenly occurred to me that surely we could install massive numbers (like hundreds of thousands) of solar panels on these very large buildings, and connect these TO THE EXISTING power transmission infrastructure. The beauty of this solution would be that no planning permission battles would need to be fought, no additional power transmission facility would be needed, and no additional negative environmental impact need be inflicted on the local environment. Now up in the Hunter the political considerations are very delicate and our politiicians are loathe to upset the status quo. Yet such a solution could be used to AUGMENT existing power generation facilities, so that over time we can develop a strategy to moving us away from fossil fuels, without having to fire a lot of miners overnight. We must move now - inertia is not an option, and countries like Australia (and Thailand for that matter) are well-placed to take advantage of the blessing of their environments to get the ball rolling. Let's act now!! Kind regards David

    • Anonymous commented : to the on the roof installed water heating system which is also using sunshine to bring the water temperature to a nice and comfortable level. This is already done and promoted by a firm vested in Pattaya under the name of A.R.C. the webpage can be found at www.arcaircon.com. Maybe there are more companies out there but this is the one I know so far going the extra mile with regard to energy saving. The house will have a cellar to store the required water tanks and batteries in a cool place if I can not feed excess power into the national grid. Further more a cellar has other good usage possibilities and all will be in a fairly cool environment. The water system will be split a.) Either a well (if possible) or water from the grid for the shower and kitchen needs b.) Rain water and/or the previously mentioned water after use for shower or washing to be used for toilet flushing with some moderate filtration first. Most probably the house will be one of a few I am afraid but I sincerely hope it might trigger some (re)thinking about natural sources / resources and the old way of doing things combined with new technology. And why all this you might ask well for one to be independent from anybody whether it’s the power supplier or water supplier. At the moment the price to be paid for energy in Thailand is not very expensive but when the first power cuts occur and the new need for power stations are budgeted then I think the same will happen as is ongoing with petrol prices at the moment. And my experience has learned me that prices go up easily but they are very hard to be brought down again and this will be explained to use as being in maintenance costs for the elder power stations the cost of maintaining the grid the higher building cost for new power stations etc etc etc. And I think Thailand will have to spend a large sum in the not so far future to re-cable the grid since the current situation is not only ugly but it is also getting dangerous.

    • Anonymous commented : on't work. Maybe for hot water you are correct. Black paint and a barrel can make a solar hot water heater, and is very scalable. But no one in Thailand needs hot water. I don't even have hot water in my apartment. For electric generation, PV cells are simply to difficult and require too much exotic technology. They are not practical in an amount necessary to make a difference. You can not cover enough buildings with PV panels to make a dent in energy production. Biomass is every bit as good, and it can all be manufactured locally here in Thailand. I encourage every one to seriously research this. It is a wonderful idea, and can be implemented entirely with local technology and skills. Biomass is the only solar technology that is scalable and can be maintained locally. I read somewhere EROEI (energy returned on energy invested) on a PV solar electric system was about 7:1 over the life of the system. On the other hand, EROEI for biomass and a gassifier as I have described it (all human labor inputs, except for the manufacture of the metal for the gasifier and generator) can be over 100:1. Think about this. Regards, Tom

    • 58 replies, 163,778 views

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