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  • News & article

    Abbot urges speedy end to temple row

    News, Lamphai Intathep, Published on 30/08/2014

    » Wat Sa Ket abbot Phra Phromsuthi has begged the public and media to stop its criticisms over a temple scandal.

  • News & article

    Iranian bullies detained

    Published on 14/09/2013

    » Police on Walking Street arrested a group of six Iranians accused of attacking a fellow national. The victim reported a sore head and damaged mouth. No particular reason for the assault was established. The culprits agreed to pay for emergency medical costs of 3,000 baht, but then admitted that they did not have enough money. Eventually, one gang member produce enough to cover the bin and police allowed all six to go free.

  • News & article

    Na Jomtien has smelly problem

    Published on 19/09/2013

    » <p>The National Environmental Board has been collecting specimens from the sea in the Na Jomtien area after the sea turned black and green in a few areas, accompanied by the stench of rotting animal flesh. One suggestion was that the cause was plankton boom phenomenon; samples have been sent to Burapha University for analysis.</p>

  • News & article

    Southeast Asian governments pledge to end dog meat trade

    Published on 19/09/2013

    » Officials to work with animal welfare coalition Asia Canine Protection Alliance Government officials from Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam have pledged to end the inhumane, commercial trade in dogs for meat. The trade is responsible for slaughtering an estimated 5 million dogs for human consumption per year. Thailand, Cambodia and Laos supply dogs for the trade into Vietnam, where they are slaughtered and consumed. Dog meat production has evolved from small-scale household businesses to a multi-million dollar industry of illicit dog traders causing pain and suffering to the dogs involved and posing health risks to humans. The trade in dogs for meat involves movement of dogs of unknown disease and vaccination status, impeding rabies elimination efforts in the region. Countries are failing to comply with their own national animal disease prevention measures, and are not following recommendations for rabies control and elimination by organizations such as the World Health Organization and the World Organization for Animal Health and the trade has been linked to outbreaks of trichinellosis, cholera and rabies. The World Health Organization recently cited the trade as a contributing factor in recent outbreaks of rabies in Indonesia and cholera in Vietnam. Government officials agreed to work to end the trade at a recent meeting in Hanoi with animal welfare coalition Asia Canine Protection Alliance. Concerned about the spread of rabies, officials said they would enact a moratorium on the commercial transport of dogs from one country to another for the next five years. In that time, authorities will measure the impact of a moratorium on rabies transmission in the region. (In Thailand, where the trade is illegal, authorities agreed to better enforcement of existing regulations.) Pornpitak Panlar, with the Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health in Thailand said, “We cannot change culture or habit, but we should stop the smuggling of dogs. This meeting was important to urge government agencies to see the problems caused by the dog meat trade and discuss a platform to stop the spread of rabies.” Nguyen Thu Thuy, deputy director, Department of Animal Health in Vietnam added, “The rabies situation has become more severe – especially this year. One of the main reasons is the illegal cross-border trade of dogs.” Boonseub Chemchoig, chief inspector general, Ministry of Interior, Thailand noted, “We never allow the transfer of dogs from Thailand to Vietnam for the purpose of consumption. We are still seeking solutions as the border between Thailand and other countries is long and difficult to manage considering the illegal trade. We are trying.” Animal protection organisations, under ACPA, will work with officials, helping to provide financial assistance, expertise and other resources as needed. ACPA is made up of Change for Animals Foundation, Humane Society International, Animals Asia and Soi Dog Foundation. “Canine rabies remains endemic in Vietnam, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia,” it was pointed out by Lola Webber, programmes leader, Change for Animals Foundation. “Ending the illegal trade in dogs destined for human consumption is a crucial component of national and regional rabies control elimination programmes.” Kelly O’Meara, director of companion animals and engagement, Humane Society International, said, “The trade is not about a desire to maintain culture or custom. The trade is profit-driven and poses a risk to human health. In addition, throughout Asia and globally, there is mounting concern for animal welfare and overwhelming evidence documenting the inherent cruelty in all stages of the trade&#8212;from sourcing, transport, sale to slaughter.”

  • News & article

    Cha-Am Celebrates Queen’s Birthday

    Published on 09/09/2013

    » The Cha-Am Municipality hosted a celebration of Queen Sirikit&#8217;s birthday which also marks Thailand&#8217;s National Mother Day on 12th August 2013. On this occasion, a mother from every local community in the City received a special Mother Day award.

  • News & article

    Good Mother of 2013

    Published on 09/09/2013

    » The director of Ban Takiab Municipal School Saman Bunhoh, the member of Hua Hin Municipal Council Cheep Suksee and the former member of Prachuab Khirikhan Provincial Council Somsak Khiewkham hosted a national mother day celebration on 9 August and gave the good mother awards to Mrs. Luen Phuengjoh, the mother of Hua Hin Today journalist Mr. Chumnan Phuengjoh, and Mrs. Chamrern Ngamnoi.

  • News & article

    Hua Hin Celebrates Founding Day

    Published on 09/09/2013

    » The Hua Hin Municipality is celebrating Founding Day on 1st October 2013 with Buddhist ceremonies and festive activities throughout the day.

  • News & article

    Oil spill threatens local beaches

    Published on 06/08/2013

    » Eastern Seaboard beaches are under threat from an oil spill stemming from a pipe leak in an offshore platform near Rayong. Using ships and helicopters, the Thai Navy and several agencies are working around the clock to contain the spread of the crude oil. The leak itself has been blocked, but not before more than 70 tons of oil had spilled into the Gulf of Thailand over an area of about 1.5 nautical miles. The primary objective of workers now is preventing the oil slick from reaching beaches, thereby threatening tourism and wild life. The offshore platform is operated by PTT Global Chemical, a subsidiary of national petroleum company PTT. Prasert Bunsumpun, company chairman, acknowledged that a crude transport pipe had begun leaking at a single-point mooring in Rayong Province. Barriers have been placed around the spill and an oil skimmer is collecting surface oil as quickly as possible, before the oil slick created an environmental catastrophe.

  • News & article

    German tourist in death leap

    Published on 02/05/2013

    » Sawangboriboon volunteers and a Pattaya Memorial Hospital team rushed to Central Festival Pattaya Beach after learning that German national Christian Klaski had climbed over a rail on the fifth floor and jumped to the ground. He died later in hospital having sustained serious head injuries. A security guard alerted police. The 34-year-old victim was identified from a police report in his possession concerning a lost passport.

  • News & article

    Pattaya to have hi-speed trains

    Published on 06/09/2012

    » The Thai government will open bidding for the first phase of a hi-speed rail project linking Bangkok to Pattaya.  Under the plan, the first four routes will cover 250 kilometers linking Bangkok to Phitsanulok, Nakhon Ratchasima and Hua Hin as well as to Pattaya.  Construction on all the four routes will begin at the same time with the aim of opening the new track network in 2018. Government approval will be necessary for the international bidding process expected to be completed next year.  China, Japan, South Korea and France have all expressed strong interest in bidding for the routes.  The plan aims to boost the country’s economy by reducing energy costs by 400 billion baht as Thailand focuses more on rail travel at the expense of road transport.  At the moment, rail accounts for only two percent of all traffic and roads for 80 percent.  The price of oil internationally is expected to double within the next five years with likely big increases in the cost of petrol. Pansak Vinyaratn, chief adviser to the prime minister, said that hi-speed trains are necessary to ensure solid growth of the country’s economy as Thailand would otherwise lose competitiveness in the long run.  Second-phase construction would mean that Bangkok would link by hi-speed rail to Chiang Mai, Nong Khai, Rayong and Hat Yai by 2022.  The new railway networks will serve both passengers and cargo, including faster transport of agricultural goods which tend to deteriorate if carried long distances by slow lorries. The details of the new routes, including the exact location of stations, have not yet been decided.  Pattaya’s tourism industry is expected to gain hugely with the arrival of a 20 minute fast train service from Bangkok or Suvarnabhumi to the seaside resort.  A City Hall source told Pattaya Today, “The current rail station is far out of the city in east Pattaya, so we are hoping that the railhead for the new hi-speed trains will be nearer the downtown area.”  Another suggestion is to build a monorail track to take passengers directly from the hi-speed train to the centres of Pattaya and Jomtien. The latest rail project will be a huge step forward in enabling Pattaya to triple its receipts from tourism by the end of the decade or soon afterwards.  Other infrastructure improvements already agreed to or in the pipeline are a beach reclamation project, more by-pass roads and tunnels, a better waste disposal system, increased supplies of potable water and several “green” projects. Critics of the scheme caution that the Pattaya authorities must ensure that the infrastructure improvements are in place before the deluge of visitors expected once the hi-speed train is operational.  “Thousands may arrive and depart by train but they will need to use the roads during their stay.  The traffic queues and pollution could easily get a lot worse if the timing is wrong,” said a prominent Pattaya businessman and estate agent. With the advent of the Asean Economic Community in 2015, a free-trade area of 10 countries in the region, economists say that the hi-speed rail plans will enhance Thailand as the logistics hub of South East Asia with all the basic infrastructure such as inland transport and rail and deep seaports to carry the expected increase in freight across national frontiers.  Also scheduled for completion in 2018 is Dawei port in Myanmar, a deep water facility with major Thai funding, which will speed up the transport of goods between Asean countries and beyond to India.

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