SEARCH

Showing 1-10 of 14 results

  • LIFESTYLE

    Lao cinema hits the jackpot

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 19/05/2017

    » In this Lao film, a nearly-blind woman is visited by ghosts that come to tell her winning lottery numbers. Her young caretaker, a girl from the countryside, takes advantage of her mistress' impairment and cashes in on the phantoms' fortunetelling, scoring win after win. On paper, it all sounds preposterous. Ghosts that give out lotto jackpots? How superstitious! How Southeast Asia! But don't be mistaken: you should go and watch Nong Hak (Dearest Sister), a well-made Lao production that spins the supernatural premise into class critique and psychological horror, ripe with atmospheric suspense. In fact, this is simply a better film in terms of script and technical standards than many Thai flicks released each year.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Oscar contenders from around the world

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 10/11/2017

    » A record 92 films have been submitted to the Oscar Foreign Language Film category. We take a look at some

  • LIFESTYLE

    Where to pay final respects to King Bhumibol

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 26/10/2017

    » The royal cremation day has arrived. Hundreds of thousands are expected to turn up at the ceremonial grounds to witness the historic event. Millions more are going to watch the proceedings on television. Those who would like to pay their last respect to King Bhumibol also have the choice of placing the sandalwood flowers at the 85 replicas of the royal crematorium around the country. There is one in each province and nine in Bangkok.

  • OPINION

    Learning to speak govt's language

    News, Kong Rithdee, Published on 19/08/2017

    » The Newspeak is the Oldspeak. The New Testament is the Old Commandments. When they say the clock strikes 13, it means the clock strikes 13. The writing isn't in the law but on the wall.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Ain't no 'one nationality' movie

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 17/07/2015

    » Cataloging movies by their nationalities is convenient, though it's getting less practical and less relevant, in this age of internationalism and cross-border influences. We have a shining case in point this week: P Chai My Hero, or How to Win at Checkers (Every Time), looks, speaks, and feels Thai, though its genealogy is truly international. The film is based on two short stories by US-based Thai writer, Rattawut Lapcharoensap and directed by Korean-American Josh Kim, who moved to Thailand two years ago and successfully mounted this independent production.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Leaving a Thai impression

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 01/01/2016

    » Once again, a small Thai film blew over Cannes Film Festival like a graceful lover. On Monday, Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Cemetery Of Splendour (or Rak Ti Khon Kaen) was screened to a thundering 10-minute standing ovation in the Un Certain Regard section, where the film's elegant formalism and aching beauty, deeply rooted in the northeastern spirit and post-coup reflection, shook up the festival slumber.

  • OPINION

    Proustian questions for our leaders

    Oped, Kong Rithdee, Published on 26/12/2015

    » What is your idea of perfect happiness? When 99.5% of respondents in a government-sponsored poll think that the government is the best thing that ever happened for this country. Or maybe in the all of the universe, because such figures are even higher than God's rating.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Documenting Southeast Asian diversity

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 20/03/2015

    » Now in its fifth edition, Salaya International Documentary Film Festival brings you real-world immediacy and reflection that covers a wide gamut of subjects — from the aftermath of the communist purge in 1960s Indonesia to the housing woes in Singapore, from the ferry tragedy in Korea to a grand tour of the National Gallery in London. The festival (better known as Salaya Doc) begins tomorrow and runs until Mar 28 at the Film Archive in Salaya and the auditorium of Bangkok Art and Culture Centre in Pathumwan (BACC). Admission is free.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Hat-trick for Thai cinema

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 06/02/2015

    » In the snowy German capital, the year's first major cinema festival has kicked off. The 65th Berlin International Film Festival (or Berlinale, as it's better known) opened last night with Nobody Wants The Night, a drama by Spanish director Isabel Coixet, starring Juliette Binoche and Rinko Kikuchi. Some of the hot world premieres include Terrence Malick's Knight Of Cups, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella, Werner Herzog's Queen Of The Desert, and other art-house darlings. The Berlinale runs until Feb 15, with the Golden Bear being announced next weekend.

  • OPINION

    Backpedalling in a parallel Thai universe

    News, Kong Rithdee, Published on 18/11/2017

    » Thailand will eradicate poverty by next year.

Your recent history

  • Recently searched

    • Recently viewed links

      Did you find what you were looking for? Have you got some comments for us?