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  • News & article

    Portrait Of An Artist

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 06/10/2019

    » "I just don't wanna be back in this place again/ I mean, I done cried a little/ Tried a little, failed a little/ I don't wanna do it again," Brittany Howard confesses on History Repeats, a funky opener to her solo debut Jaime. Built on acid jazz and neo-soul groove, the song bustles with the genre-blurring spirit of her former band Alabama Shakes and her own irreverent energy. Singing those words, Howard sounds empowered and energised like a weight has been lifted. "History repeats and we defeat ourselves/ Come on everybody, one more time again," before you know it, the song turns into an infectious anthem, leaving in its wake a glimpse into her self-discovery that would go on to define the rest of the album.

  • News & article

    Sip on this

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 16/06/2019

    » Born and raised in Spanish Town, just outside Kingston in Jamaica, Mikayla "Koffee" Simpson became known three years ago for her viral video in which she played her acoustic guitar and sang a dedication to Olympic legend Usain Bolt. Now, the 19-year-old newcomer has finally come through with her debut EP, the five-track Rapture helmed by a panel of stellar reggae producers Teflon ZincFence, Lasanna "Ace" Harris, Frankie Music and Walshy Fire.

  • News & article

    Anthems for the end of the world

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 24/03/2019

    » If you happen to recall the indie explosion that came and went during the mid-noughties, you're most likely to recall how UK math-rockers Foals were perched right on the forefront alongside the now-nowhere-to-be-found groups like Kasabian, Hard-Fi and Maxïmo Park. Although not the first band to come up with it, they're largely responsible for spreading the gospel of that intricate, tightly-wound guitar work that's gone on to more or less define the genre. Over time, the Foals' signature hectic romp that was the backbone of their 2008 landmark debut, Antidotes, has transformed into something a little more polished and more mature. Subtle sonic shifts can already be detected on their second LP, Total Life Forever (how much of a revelation is Spanish Sahara?), and even more so on the subsequent records, the unabashedly potent Holy Fire and What Went Down.

  • News & article

    A glow of satisfaction

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 18/08/2019

    » In 2017, the world got to know singer-songwriter Mattiel Brown and her band (guitarist Jonah Swilley, bassist Travis Murphy and drummer Jordan Manley) for the first time. Collectively called Mattiel, the up-and-coming quartet made quite an impression with their self-titled debut -- so much so that they garnered an endorsement from Jack White. Since then, the hype surrounding the band has been nothing short of palpable. People are genuinely excited by Mattiel's sound, which takes cues from rock'n'roll legends like The Ramones, The Rolling Stones and The Velvet Underground, and garage/punk icons like Patti Smith and The Clash.

  • News & article

    So long Hawaiian shirt, hello disco ball

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 25/08/2019

    » The wait for and the painfully gradual lead-up to the release of Friendly Fires' third studio album, Inflorescent, have been a year-long affair, a process that began early last year with a quiet banger Love Like Waves. The way the album unfolds over the course of 15 months is perhaps not the most ideal in the age of music streaming where artists and labels have to appease elusive algorithms and metadata by constantly pumping out what they hope would be a next big smash.

  • News & article

    Small things considered

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 23/06/2019

    » In much the same way that eyes are said to be the window to the soul, band names give us a glimpse into the collective personality lurking behind each group. And as far as Thai band names are concerned, they can range from prosaic (Solitude Is Bliss, My Life As Ali Thomas) and whimsical (Apartment Khunpa, Charblues, Gym and Swim) to absolutely outlandish (Big Ass, Calories Blah Blah). For Sakon Nakhon-based trio Junlaholaan, names represent a curious juxtaposition where two incongruous concepts (jun, micro, and holaan, enormous) coexist to convey a deeply philosophical message. Yes, we are but a tiny speck in the universe -- the band seems to be saying -- but at the same time, a butterfly in Brazil could also cause a tornado in Texas, couldn't it?

  • News & article

    Keeping them keen

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 02/06/2019

    » In many ways, the enduring success of UK four-piece Keane is a curious phenomenon. Formed in 1995, the quartet of four rather ordinary-looking white lads from East Sussex rose to rock prominence with their debut album, 2004's Hopes And Fears. Thanks to the strength of radio-friendly singles like Somewhere Only We Know and Everybody's Changing, they were able to contend with a lot of their rock/indie contemporaries who were also just starting out then -- The Killers, Franz Ferdinand, The Futureheads, Razorlight and The Libertines. While some of those bands have lost their steam or even vanished in the aftermath of the indie-rock heyday, it seems that Keane are still alive and well despite the six-year hiatus following 2013's hits compilation, The Best Of Keane.

  • News & article

    Returning to form

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 31/03/2019

    » It's hard to believe it's been nearly two decades since Ladytron unleashed its own version of electropop to the world. Hailing from Liverpool, the quartet of Helen Marnie, Mira Aroyo, Daniel Hunt and Reuben Wu first introduced themselves with their 2001 debut 604, a solid 16-track collection heavily influenced by the likes of Kraftwerk, New Order and Depeche Mode. In a period when the UK charts sounded a little uninspired (the No.1 singles ranged from JLo's Love Don't Cost A Thing to Limp Bizkit's Rollin' to Afroman's Because I Got High -- you get the idea), Ladytron's simmering cauldron of synth-pop and electro-industrial almost felt like an act of rebellion.

  • News & article

    Giddy up, boy

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 14/04/2019

    » On Mitski's latest album Be The Cowboy, the cowboy image that's classically reserved for American white males is, even though for a fleeting moment, suspended and transferred to the Japanese-American singer-songwriter. According to Mitski, this is part of her mantra, "be the cowboy you wish to see in the world", a joke with herself that she uses to combat feelings of imposter syndrome. Though meant as a joke, it's a kind of joke that digs deep into the firmly rooted notions of masculinity, race and femininity.

  • News & article

    James Blake's Changing Form

    B Magazine, Chanun Poomsawai, Published on 10/03/2019

    » "Now I'm confiding, know I may have/ Gone through the motions my whole life/ I hope this is the first day/ That I connect motion to feeling," James Blake wears his heart on his sleeve on the piano-driven opener/title track of his fourth studio album, Assume Form. The candid openness with which Blake addresses depression and anxiety, the struggles he's confessed of having since his 2011 debut album took off, is stunning to witness especially for an artist whose career is mostly built on nuances, abstraction and negative spaces.

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