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  • LIFE

    Making a good meal start at home

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 28/04/2019

    » Why do people in Bangkok rely mostly on food from vendors or restaurants? There are multiple answers to this. Some spend most of their time on the road. Cooking is not allowed in some apartments and condominiums. Hoarding ingredients like meat and vegetables is too complicated for some. Others have no cooking experience. Or believe it's a waste of time. Some think it costs more to cook at home than dining out.

  • LIFE

    The pros and cons of eating out

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 18/08/2019

    » I am often asked which one is better and cheaper -- cooking at home or eating out. Some people are wondering why food shops and noodle shops sell the same dishes at different prices. In the meantime, many are figuring out the operating cost of restaurants to compare with the cost of home cooking.

  • LIFE

    Eating Amid The Great Outdoors

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 17/12/2017

    » I may not have to explain how much fun it is to picnic. When asking family members or your loved ones to go on a picnic, chances are everybody would say yes. Organising a picnic trip requires finding (sometimes booking) a scenic spot and preparing food and drinks for your outdoor dining. This might be a little extra work, but it's worth it.

  • LIFE

    Devilishly delicious detail

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 18/09/2016

    » Doing your own cooking gives you many advantages. For one, you are able to choose and buy the ingredients, selecting them from the array available at the market to ensure that they are clean and safe, and priced to match your budget. Just as important is the ability it gives you to try a recipe and see how it goes over with your family members, and to possibly make adjustments later to bring it into line with their preferences.

  • LIFE

    Dishing on noodles

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 29/01/2017

    » It might just be chauvinism on my part, and perhaps I just have it wrong, but I have the impression that Thailand has more noodle dishes than any other country. For starters, there are kuay tio luuk chin plaa (rice noodles with balls of pounded fish meat), ba-mee muu daeng or pet yang (wheat noodles with Chinese red pork or grilled duck meat), kuay tio ruea (rice "boat noodles"), kuay tio nuea (rice noodles with beef), kuai tio khae (Hakka style), kuay tio kaeng (also known as kuay tio khaek, in curried coconut cream sauce) and kuay tio kai mara (with chicken and bitter melon).

  • LIFE

    The age of perfectionists

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 11/12/2016

    » This is the age of data. Making food is easy now because there are cookbooks everywhere and ingredients of all kinds are widely available and easy to buy. Any bookshop will have its cookbook section, offering an array of volumes with clear photographs and precise instructions as to measurements and techniques.

  • LIFE

    Gone but not forgotten

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 07/08/2016

    » Many old Thai dishes that were familiar to people of a few generations ago are gone now, but among the old dishes, a number have been revived and are appearing on menus again. In many cases there have been revisions and adaptations, however, with new ingredients introduced as substitutes for original ones that are hard to find now, or that may no longer be available at all.

  • LIFE

    What's cooking for breakfast?

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 08/01/2017

    » Everyone knows that breakfast is an important meal, but when looked at closely, it is as loaded with cultural significance as it is with vitamins and nutrients to fuel the coming day. It can provide a wealth of detailed information on the local environment, on the historical era in which it is or was eaten, the kind of work done by and the social status of the family who prepare and eat it, and the prevailing awareness of the relationship between food and good health.

  • LIFE

    Having enough on your plate

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 14/08/2016

    » By the term "one-dish meal", most people mean a meal where a single plateful will fill them up. But using satiety as the basis if the definition doesn't really work, because people have different capacities. Some eat very little, while others prefer a big meal. For example, some food shop customers might not feel full after finishing off a plate of pork fried rice and order a plate of kui tiao sen yai raad naa (broad rice noodles with meat in gravy) as a follow up, or start off with pork noodles and then move on to a bowl of yen ta fo. Both examples show that it takes a combination of these dishes to fill up some members of the clientele, and that both cooked-to-order food shops and noodles shops will offer a variety of dishes.

  • LIFE

    Food for thought

    B Magazine, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 11/08/2019

    » Designing a good kitchen is a tricky task that requires a lot of thought and planning. Kitchens in modern housing, however, often seem to be something of an afterthought.

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