SEARCH

Showing 1-5 of 5 results

  • OPINION

    'My country's got' these socio-political ills

    News, Thitinan Pongsudhirak, Published on 02/11/2018

    » The explosive Rap Against Dictatorship music video that has taken Thailand by storm has raised myriad socio-political questions and issues. Known in Thai as <i>Prathet Ku Mee</i>, the sensational music video has been viewed on YouTube more than 25 million times in just 10 days in a country of 69 million people, a feat in its own right and a record for its artistic kind in Thailand. How this five-minute rap song in the Thai language has done so much says a lot about where Thailand has been and where it is going.

  • OPINION

    Military regime can't turn back the clock of progress

    News, Achara Ashayagachat, Published on 12/08/2014

    » My memory of one of this country's democratic milestones — the student uprising of Oct 14, 1973 — was my grandmother sobbing while watching His Majesty the King's announcement on TV about a new government replacing the military dictatorship that students had tried to topple.

  • OPINION

    New Chula library honours Chamnan

    News, Ploenpote Atthakor, Published on 08/09/2014

    » Chamnan Yuvaboon, born 100 years ago this year and still going strong, is a man with a distinguished background. He was an outstanding student — the country's first to complete a doctorate degree from Thammasat University's political science faculty in 1953. After starting his career in a junior position in the Interior Ministry, he became a well-recognised figure for the many initiatives he started that still function today.

  • OPINION

    Coming to terms with a brutal history

    News, Kritsada Supawattanakul, Published on 06/10/2016

    » Neal Ulevich's awarding-winning picture of a man who was about to beat a dead man hanged from a tamarind tree as a group of people looked on in Sanam Luang is one of the most recognised records of the brutal crackdown on pro-democracy students that took place 40 years ago today.

  • OPINION

    Ajarn Ben's Southeast Asian analyses still enlighten

    News, Philip J Cunningham, Published on 15/12/2015

    » When I studied with Benedict Anderson at Cornell University in 1974, he seemed the quintessential absent-minded professor; at once erudite and bookish, idealistic and dreamy-eyed. The fact he had just been kicked out of Indonesia only added to his aura. Giving lectures about coups and counter-coups and revolutionary martyrs, he'd pace the front of the classroom in clunky boots and mismatched outfits, captivating class attention with his soft but mellifluous Irish-accented voice.

Your recent history

  • Recently searched

    • Recently viewed links

      Did you find what you were looking for? Have you got some comments for us?