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"country" Search Results - Bangkok Post : The world windows to Thailand

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  • OPINION

    'My country's got' these socio-political ills

    News, Thitinan Pongsudhirak, Published on 02/11/2018

    » The explosive Rap Against Dictatorship music video that has taken Thailand by storm has raised myriad socio-political questions and issues. Known in Thai as <i>Prathet Ku Mee</i>, the sensational music video has been viewed on YouTube more than 25 million times in just 10 days in a country of 69 million people, a feat in its own right and a record for its artistic kind in Thailand. How this five-minute rap song in the Thai language has done so much says a lot about where Thailand has been and where it is going.

  • OPINION

    Instability threatens economic growth

    News, Wichit Chantanusornsiri, Published on 27/04/2019

    » Without decisive winners from the March 24 poll, there are fears that political instability will affect the country's economy. Such concerns are understandable given that three parties, namely the pro-military Palang Pracharath Party, and Pheu Thai Party and Future Forward Party (which brand themselves as the anti-regime camp), are engaging in a post-election tug of war.

  • OPINION

    Public starts to reject our abnormalities

    News, Paritta Wangkiat, Published on 29/10/2018

    » The rap song with music video <i>Prathet Ku Mee</i> (My Country's Got It) by a rapper group called Rap Against Dictatorship (RAD) has truly sent shockwaves into our society, with views surpassing surpassing 12 million in a very short time.

  • OPINION

    When the president said 'sock it to me'

    News, Roger Crutchley, Published on 04/08/2019

    » My apologies for unwittingly being the purveyor of fake news in last week's column, mistakenly crediting Goldie Hawn with the "sock it to me" catchphrase from the Laugh-In show. It was actually the English actress Judy Carne who was the regular "sock it to me" girl, although Hawn did also come out with the expression on occasions.

  • OPINION

    Preserving 'Thainess'

    News, Postbag, Published on 04/07/2019

    » Re: "Differing paradigm", (PostBag, July 2).

  • OPINION

    A new Potemkin village in Moscow

    News, Published on 24/07/2018

    » If Karl Marx could see Russia today, he might revise his view of religion's role in oppressive regimes. In the country's capital, urbanism has become the new opium of the people.

  • OPINION

    Zombie land

    Life, Arusa Pisuthipan, Published on 18/02/2019

    » In the Netflix original series Kingdom, the virtuous crown prince Lee Chang gallops off to a faraway land in search of an ancient doctor to help him unravel the mysterious circumstances of his father's death. Meanwhile, a wicked nobleman tries to resurrect the king for his own nefarious purposes. But in so doing, he turns the dead king into a bloodthirsty zombie. And we all know what a zombie bite does to its victim. A zombie plague ensues, spreading throughout the land.

  • OPINION

    Rallies are about seeking equality

    News, Editorial, Published on 09/12/2018

    » The "yellow vests" protest phenomenon which gripped France over the past few weeks may make some policymakers engaged in a fight against global warming think about a policy U-turn. It should not be so.

  • OPINION

    Time for the regime to face the music

    News, Atiya Achakulwisut, Published on 30/10/2018

    » Finally, the return to democracy has begun. It's raw. It's vulgar. It's controversial. It has also unleashed a rush of polarised opinions. Police are gunning to outlaw it as more people flock to view it online, with over 21 million on YouTube for the music video in question as of yesterday mid-afternoon.

  • OPINION

    The kids are all right

    News, Alan Dawson, Published on 28/10/2018

    » <i>Prathet Ku Mee</i> is no slapped-together concert song. It wasn't made, so much as crafted. The accusatory lyrics are set against the shameful, hovering background of the 1976 dictators' massacre at Thammasat University. The rap song's finale brings the background image of the hanged, beaten student to the front of the picture, before fading out to the hopeful message, "All people unite".

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