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    Forum

    Trend of economy in Thailand

    By Anonymous, Created on: 29/08/2007, Last updated on: 19/05/2012

    » Economy is to exchange currency or things depend on the agreement of conditions. Economy growth will depend on its factor. In my opinion, trend of economy in Thailand in the last half year may to expand. I have three reasons for supporting my idea. First, businessmen have more trust for investing...

    • 4amExpat commented : Three points to suggest economy will slow. 1. Global credit crunch has destroyed the appetite for bank lending and risky investing. Most of the Western banking system has seen the effects of this, there is not reason to suspect Thailand won't as well. 2. The condo boom and auto sales in Thailand have happened for the same reason they boomed in the West: Ease of credit. As it becomes less easy, less cars, condos and product will be sold. 3. Taksin was good for the economy, where as the political uncertainty of the coming administration may not be.

    • 4 replies, 17,624 views

    Forum

    Proof of income needed to marry?

    By Anonymous, Created on: 03/01/2008, Last updated on: 01/01/2009

    » Can someone please clarify if you need a proof of income in order to marry in Bangkok in an Amphur Office?

    • Sean Moran commented : [quote="alohaman":z1um4uez]I am an American and have been living in Thailand for 8 months now. I would like to marry a Thai lady but have no idea on what " paper work " I need and if there are any income requirements. Also, how does marriage to a Thai lady effect my Visa status. Finally, can anyone tell me about being able to own a Scooter while on a Tourist Visa Permit in Thailand.[/quote:z1um4uez] Sorry to take so long to read your post, Alohaman. Marriage isn't my forte, so I only just clicked on this thread out of sheer boredom, but I can possibly give some advice on motorcycle matters. I believe that after you and your fiancee are married, you might look at the Non-Immigrant Type O visa, but please check these things out because it's old information from 2005-06 and I'm no expert on visas nor the legalities of marriages. I believe it might still require you to check in with the Immigration office every 90 days, but check the facts which I reckon you can find on the web through the Thai Immigration Dept website. Regarding the moto-sai though, step one is a drivers' license, and I have always managed well enough on my International Driving Permit issued by the RAC automobile association in Australia, even though the Aussie drivers' license is confined to four-wheeled vehicles only. I can't legally ride a bike on Australian roads, but the permit has always sufficed in Thailand. I've also been riding motorcycles since the age of 5 so I'm fairly qualified to ride a bike; it's just that I've never bothered to get the local administrivia paid for, but the International Permit is generally good enough if you're polite when you get pulled over by the boys in brown. Don't make trouble and hopefully you won't get any back. Buying bikes is no problem if you have the money. That's why God invented capitalism. Getting the bike transferred into your name on a tourist visa might be a hassle though. I've bought two bikes all up, and made sure to always carry copies of the receipts and details from the shop in my wallet wherever I ride. There has never been any question of my rightful ownership of the bike I'm riding when I've been pulled over for any of the usual checkpoints. Selling the bike afterwards might be a little more interesting. In the first case, the bike ended up in the police holding yard in good rideable order after I hit a Toyota and needed my brain renovated in the hospital. I got medivacced back to Australia and the bike stayed in that yard for two months, until I contacted my best mate in LoS, who happened to be an ex-cop himself, but didn't own a motor vehicle at the time, and he got it out of the yard for around 2,000 baht. It only cost me 6,500 to start with, and after having had to pay for the damage my body had done to the car's bonnet, (Am Eng: hood) the bike was his. It hopefully still is. The second bike I bought from a shop, and had problems completing the transfer, (probably due to the tourist visa second-class citizen issue) but I had the bike serviced at that same shop around four times over the four months I rode it around, and sold it back to that same shop for 66% of what I paid for it, and they paid me cash too. It's possible to do it on a tourist visa, if you don't get obnoxious about things, and if you can accept that you're probably going to end up selling it for substantially less than what you paid. The alternative of hiring a bike or car is to not get a brass razoo back though, so bearing that in mind, head down to your local mo-sai shop with 15,000- 20,000 baht in your sky rocket and you should have no problems, hopefully. Please let me know more about the motorbike part because I've got a bit of knowledge on Thai bikes, and might be able to help further with specifics on the type of bike itself. If you got the money, they'll happily sell you a bike, but keep on good terms with the shop, and you might have less trouble selling it on a tourist visa. ---ooo--- BTW: I started a thread on Thai motorcycles last Saturday and I added photos of both bikes I've just mentioned: viewtopic.php?f=54&t=613

    • 21 replies, 32,495 views

    Forum

    Are the foreigners finding a sense of peace in Issarn?

    By pachangamac042, Created on: 07/03/2009, Last updated on: 14/05/2009

    » Dear FOS, I quite agree with you. I-Saan can still be a very charming place, even for me, I do see two different faces of I-Saan. The country side with its villages and the big metropolitan areas. I grow up in a little village with some 500 inhabitants myself. In our village there were more cows,...

    • DocN commented : Dear random yes they are a special bunch of people in Isaan. I am making that experience right now. But I guess I mean "special" not in the way you mean it! Let me introduce myself: I am a 42 year old farang from Germany. I came here in Oct. 2007, because I wanted to work abroad and as I spent (business and holiday) a lot of tinme in Thailand and I liked it, I though:"Why not go t a place you like?!". Afte 1 month I met a very nice Isaan girl (guess where? yes, Patpong!) and unfortunately I fell in love with her. Not unfortunately for her or her family, as I was giving her and them, whatever I could. I still love my girlfriend, as she is not the problem. First, I had to learn that her mom married her to a guy she had never seen before, when she was 18. Now...I know that there are arranged marriages, so I was not really shocked. He got her pregnant after a few months and as she was in the hospital, giving birth to their son, her sister saw that guy, running around with other women. (He later confessed that he was f-ing around for a long time already...well...seems not to be a major problem in Thailand or in Isaan, doesn't seem to bother him or anyone else, except my girlfriend, much) She got divorced and now (with a son) she had to go to Bangkok to work, left the son with her mom to get some money! And where does an uneducated woman of 20 years get a job? (Of course: this whole tearjerking story may be a lie and I a just a stupid farang, falling for it...but just assume for a second it was no lie!) Uneducated? Yes- her parents took her out of school when she was 12. Thats how I met her. I have no doubts in her honesty or whatever (stupid or not? not my turn to decide!) After some time we were talking about marriage (mind you it was just talking...not planning) and she informed me, that her mother wanted 500.000 Baht from me, when I married her daughter! 1) This is not rent-a-friend, so I will not pay anything. 2) I hate to talk about a woman like about a used car, but as I understand, this money is a kind of a "reward" for the parents, because they made her daughter to be a good wife, educate her and so on. Now: a girl who is takin' from school at 12 and who works in a bar and who brings a 5 year old son into the marriage...doesn't sound like she (or I) have a lot that we could thank her mom for! (yeah...giving life to her...blah blah...) 2 months ago, her family "comanded" her back to Nong Khai. Her mom was sick (we know, that was a lie!) and as mom took care of her son, it was now her duty to return and take care of mom. (A son that- if I might add- wouldn't even exist, if her mom wouldn't have sold her daughter like a slave, to some random stranger!) But ok- my girlfriend and I decided to make the best out of the situation and see each other every two weeks for a long weekend and call each other every day. Suddenly, my girlfriend told me that her mother wants to get 4000 Baht from me every month. Why? I have no idea and my girlfriend told me, not to worry about it. Now...so you don't get the wrong idea: I am sending /giving my girlfriend money every month for her and her son (and if she gives it to her mom...I can't change it...it's hers) and I pay this and that for her family, make presents to her mom, her sisters, her brothers... Yesterday my girlfriend told me, that her mom took away her ATM -card, ID-card and money, because she doen't want her daughter to go to Bangkok anymore to see me. I have no reason to doubt my girlfriend (maybe you think I should!?)...and as I said: let's assume it is the truth. Where I come from (mother or not) this is called theft and it is close to keeping her daughter hostage. These people know nothing about gratefullness for anything, they have no respect for me (and apart from me, not being willing to pay ridiculous amounts of money, I have never given them any reason to do so) or my girlfriend. Now I am not saying that all people of Isaan are that way and sure, everything may be my fault...but these guys are completely insane! They are not an example for all Isaan people and the guys f-ing around on Patpong are not the example for tourists. I respect everybody and be nice and humble to, if I feel respected. Sure: I may not be 100% familiar with EVERY thai-rule (I am not thai!), but I guess everyone makes mistakes by working abroad. Isaan is NOT the haven of tranquility, Thailand is not heaven on earth! We are all people, we all have to learn and we all make mistakes. But hiding behind "tradition" just to cover up greed...is as bad as thinking that Bangkok is the equivalent of Thailand. No offense!

    • 11 replies, 26,253 views

    Forum

    Land purchase through Thai spouse forbidden: Land Dept

    By Suttisan, Created on: 28/05/2009, Last updated on: 02/10/2016

    » -- Land purchase through Thai spouse forbidden: Land Dept The director general of the Land Department has reiterated that foreigners using Thai nominees to buy land anywhere in the country will have their land title deeds revoked if caught – even if the nominee in question is a lawfully wedded...

    • Ian commented : Krumm, I wonder how far down the chain of causuality we can go, it is a bit like money laundering? Suppose I gave my gf an expensive secondhand car as a gift (I assume this is legal), which she then sold with a negligable loss (that's why I specified second hand). She now has money in the bank. Repeat this one or more times. She now has enough to buy a house, if she now gives me a cheap lease for 30 years isn't this simply saying 'thank you' for buying all those cars? Or suppose I make an outright gift to a male Thai friend, who then decides to gift it to my gf, who then buys a house. Was it bought with my money or my friend's money? Or to really confuse the trail, I give ten lots of money to ten people, these ten then each decide to give it to my gf. Heck as long as everyone trusts each other you could build a really long chain of handlers

    • 186 replies, 1,555,754 views

  • Directory

    Thai Poly Acrylic PCL

    Industrial, Sam Phran, Nakhonpathom

    Price : N/A, Posted on 19/04/2010

    » Thai Poly Acrylic PCL is a manufacturer of acrylic, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene and polystyrene sheets. The products are sold under the brand name Moden Glas. These products are found in cars, accessories, door bumpers, internal refrigerator

  • News & article

    Digitising duty free to boost airline revenue

    Database, Don Sambandaraksa, Published on 05/05/2010

    » With margins being squeezed tighter and tighter, and low-cost, no-frills carriers on the rise, airlines are having to find new ways of generating revenue. One avenue is duty free sales and Guest-Logix offers solutions for airlines and trains to tap into their captive audience and monetise them.

  • Forum

    ICONIC RANGE ROVER TURNS 40

    By prnews, Created on: 28/06/2010, Last updated on: 28/06/2010

    » ICONIC RANGE ROVER TURNS 40  The Range Rover celebrates its 40th birthday on 17 June 2010  The Range Rover was the world's first fully capable luxury 4x4  There have been three generations of Range Rover: the original (Classic) in 1970, second-generation (P38a) in 1994 and third-generation...

    • 0 replies, 4,049 views

  • News & article

    Call in the cyber warriors

    Database, Published on 14/07/2010

    » After the authorities detained him for two months without bail, friends of Wipas Raksakulthai revealed that the 37-year-old Ranong businessman had been jailed over posts found by the Centre for Repressing Embarrassing Subjects; handsome CRES spokesmen were unavailable for direct comment, but friends said Mr Wipas was a well-known red shirt; since his arrest, Thai Facebook users have criticised him, and have revealed personal information meant for friends on his web page; according to Mr Wipas' friends, a network of Thai Facebook users exists to seek and inform the CRES and the Ministry of Internet Censorship in Thailand (MICT) when they find nasty writing; media expert Supinya Klangnarong said it was ominous that the government had spread its censorship policies to social networks.

  • Forum

    The prospective In-laws

    By cadcolin, Created on: 14/07/2010, Last updated on: 01/09/2010

    » Ok so i meet my dream girl who has agreed to be my wife meet the parents got there blessing everybody is happy been back in the uk a week and the prospective in-laws are now currently organising the society weddding of the century my gf is crying all the time her parenst have gone completley crazy...

    • faranginkorat commented : [quote="temple":19km3nmm]:evil: why the farangs alway talk about this,it is the thai culture that the daughter will take care of the parent if you cannot understand so you do not think about to mary thai girl.study more thai culture.[/quote:19km3nmm] There are several reasons that many of us resent the assumption that we will support the parents-in-law. 1. There are two cultures involved here, why assume Thai culture prevails? 2. The parents had 40 years to work, save, and invest for their retirement. If they failed to do that, why is that our problem? 3. If support of parents is so important, maybe our Thai wives should get jobs so we can send money to our parents?? 4. I've supported the wife's family for the last 10 years, and her father isn't even polite to me. He graduated the 4th grade and I graduated M.I.T. twice. He inherited family land and money whileI was from the second of my father's three wives and inherited nothing. He failed at everything he ever tried, I didn't. I pay for his food, medicine, electricity for air-conditioning, bought his vehicle for him, paid off long term family debts, and he expects me to kreng jai him????? I just retired early at 55 and the money to the family stopped. Curious, nobody has started sending me money!!! I have land I will sell when I am older if I need money. He has land he can sell, but I hear that is not consistent with Thai culture. Why should I give him my savings so that he doesn't need to sell his land and then sell my land when my money is gone????? He sold family land 15 years ago for huge money, enough to have retired on, and that money was gone in a year. (He has a designer watch he paid 30,000 THB for when he had money but now he wants me to feed him??? I have no designer watch, no watch at all in fact.) Has Thai culture changed so much in 15 years that it was OK to sell land off the family homestead then but he can't now sell distant rice paddy that hasn't been used in 35 years?? The wife's older sister hasn't given the parents a single baht yet, but has money to buy a brand new Isuzu Adventure, and went on a tour of India last year, looking for some place that Buddha might have visited.......... (I will resume support after they sell unused assets to support themselves, after they stop travelling the world (two extended vacation trips to the USA in recent years), and after the sister-in-law agrees to provide an equal amount.) I could go on and on. What is consistently true in Thai culture is that people want easy money with total disregard for where it comes from. My savings come from having started working and saving when I was 11. I have always driven old cars, drank cheap beer, not had coffee with breakfast at McDonalds, and always saved for the future. Her family, who have saved nothing, are perfectly happy to piss away what I have and leave me with nothing for my retirement. And I have told my family that I would take the long swim (or put a gun to my head) before asking my daughter for support. Asking your children for support is the ultimate admission of your total failure in life. Now do you understand a little more about my culture???????????????????

    • overhaul38 commented : [quote="faranginkorat":202bdcoz][quote="temple":202bdcoz]:evil: why the farangs alway talk about this,it is the thai culture that the daughter will take care of the parent if you cannot understand so you do not think about to mary thai girl.study more thai culture.[/quote:202bdcoz] There are several reasons that many of us resent the assumption that we will support the parents-in-law. 1. There are two cultures involved here, why assume Thai culture prevails? 2. The parents had 40 years to work, save, and invest for their retirement. If they failed to do that, why is that our problem? 3. If support of parents is so important, maybe our Thai wives should get jobs so we can send money to our parents?? 4. I've supported the wife's family for the last 10 years, and her father isn't even polite to me. He graduated the 4th grade and I graduated M.I.T. twice. He inherited family land and money whileI was from the second of my father's three wives and inherited nothing. He failed at everything he ever tried, I didn't. I pay for his food, medicine, electricity for air-conditioning, bought his vehicle for him, paid off long term family debts, and he expects me to kreng jai him????? I just retired early at 55 and the money to the family stopped. Curious, nobody has started sending me money!!! I have land I will sell when I am older if I need money. He has land he can sell, but I hear that is not consistent with Thai culture. Why should I give him my savings so that he doesn't need to sell his land and then sell my land when my money is gone????? He sold family land 15 years ago for huge money, enough to have retired on, and that money was gone in a year. (He has a designer watch he paid 30,000 THB for when he had money but now he wants me to feed him??? I have no designer watch, no watch at all in fact.) Has Thai culture changed so much in 15 years that it was OK to sell land off the family homestead then but he can't now sell distant rice paddy that hasn't been used in 35 years?? The wife's older sister hasn't given the parents a single baht yet, but has money to buy a brand new Isuzu Adventure, and went on a tour of India last year, looking for some place that Buddha might have visited.......... (I will resume support after they sell unused assets to support themselves, after they stop travelling the world (two extended vacation trips to the USA in recent years), and after the sister-in-law agrees to provide an equal amount.) I could go on and on. What is consistently true in Thai culture is that people want easy money with total disregard for where it comes from. My savings come from having started working and saving when I was 11. I have always driven old cars, drank cheap beer, not had coffee with breakfast at McDonalds, and always saved for the future. Her family, who have saved nothing, are perfectly happy to piss away what I have and leave me with nothing for my retirement. And I have told my family that I would take the long swim (or put a gun to my head) before asking my daughter for support. Asking your children for support is the ultimate admission of your total failure in life. Now do you understand a little more about my culture???????????????????[/quote:202bdcoz] Well said.... I don't think most Western husbands object to helping (the operative word is helping) those less fortunate but I think the resentment comes when they feel taken advantage of and not respected.

    • 47 replies, 87,744 views

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