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  • NEWS

    Abhisit OK working with military

    News, Dave Kendall, Published on 17/03/2019

    » Democrat leader Abhisit Vejjajiva says he wants "a mandate from the ballot box straight away" to become Thailand's next prime minister, that he would join a no-confidence motion against a future Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha if there were "good reasons" and categorically rules out supporting any future coups -- although he's open to working with pro-military Palang Pracharath Party (PPRP) "if the government is not corrupt and will not carry on with non-democratic processes".

  • OPINION

    Fifty fascinating years in Wonderland

    News, Roger Crutchley, Published on 14/04/2019

    » Having first arrived in Thailand a few days before Songkran, each year the festival approaches it sparks memories of those early days in the Kingdom. This year is slightly more significant because earlier this week marked my 50th year in Thailand, or to put it another way, roughly 18,250 days. That sounds decidedly scary. The frightening thing is that I can remember those early days better than the events of last week. The immature youth is now an immature wrinkly.

  • OPINION

    A step forward

    News, Postbag, Published on 11/04/2019

    » Re: "FM's outburst", (BP, April 10). I could understand Foreign Minister Don Pramudwinai's outburst at the diplomatic saga which took place at Pathumwan police station where 12 diplomats from the EU, UN and Western embassies were present to observe the sedition proceedings against Thanathorn Juangroongruangkit, Future Forward Party leader. But I have two observations:

  • OPINION

    PM's tricky position

    News, Postbag, Published on 30/03/2019

    » Re: "Poll uncertainty lingers as count nears finish line", (Commentary, March 29).

  • OPINION

    Post-poll policy: Dynamic continuity

    News, Kavi Chongkittavorn, Published on 26/03/2019

    » Speculation is rife about imminent changes in Thailand's diplomatic direction after five years of military-ruled guidance. Political pundits and campaigners ahead of the polls last week also sent out strong signals that they expect a new cabinet in Government House with new policies. One of the casualties would be Thai-Chinese ties, which have progressed and strengthened without waveringly over the past five years. However, the outcome of Sunday's election indicates that whichever parties form the next civilian government, there will be little effect on the country's foreign relations or the current Asean chair. Indeed, Thailand's foreign policy will become more dynamic with continuity.

  • OPINION

    Political 'cobras' are poisoning our democracy

    News, Paritta Wangkiat, Published on 01/04/2019

    » People who are familiar with Thai politics must know the metaphor ngu hao, literally cobra, which implies betrayal, dirty political games and bargaining.

  • OPINION

    Mourning Virachai

    News, Postbag, Published on 18/03/2019

    » Re: "Virachai's death loss to the nation", (Editorial, March 17).

  • LIFESTYLE

    Lucky enough

    Brunch, Tatat Bunnag, Published on 17/03/2019

    » Any celebrity would want their face to be seen anywhere, be it press, radio, TV or social media. But sometimes it can be a double-edged sword that could do both harm and good.

  • OPINION

    NLA's cyber bill rush shows poor intent

    News, Paritta Wangkiat, Published on 04/03/2019

    » The coup-installed National Legislative Assembly (NLA) last week approved the controversial cybersecurity bill, shrugging off public concerns over its threats to personal and corporate data privacy and human rights issues.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Let's get political (art)

    Guru, Pasavat Tanskul, Published on 08/03/2019

    » With the upcoming general election finally happening on Mar 24, the fate of the city hangs in the balance of voters hoping for some actual policy changes that leans toward democracy. However, some may express scepticism and while expressing one's doubts and criticism could be met with scorn and censorship, there are a few people who have expressed their opinions in other forms -- namely street art. Enter Headache Stencil, an anonymous masked political painter whose art usually deals with Thailand's recent social and political happenings.

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