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    PR news / Promotions / Events

    KU Go Green: Kasetsart University Committed

    By prnews, Created on: 21/01/2019, Last updated on: 21/01/2019

    » [attachment=2:2lng0nxn]highlight.jpg[/attachment:2lng0nxn][b:2lng0nxn]KU Go Green: Kasetsart University Committed to a green university[/b:2lng0nxn] Dr. Chongrak Wachrinrat, Acting President of Kasetsart University together with Dr. Visit Cochasit, Chief Executive Officer of Beta Energy Solution...

    • 0 replies, 159 views

    PR news / Promotions / Events

    Toyota Presents Unrivalled Experience

    By prnews, Created on: 07/08/2017, Last updated on: 07/08/2017

    » [b:3twrnb6m]In “The Future is Here” at TOYOTA Expo On 3 – 13 August 2017, at Siam Paragon[/b:3twrnb6m] [attachment=2:3twrnb6m]Toyota Expo_003_resize.JPG[/attachment:3twrnb6m] [b:3twrnb6m]Dr. Uttama Savanayana, Minister of Industry, together with Mr. Michinobu Sugata, Managing Officer of Toyota...

    • 0 replies, 856 views

    For sale

    Floating Solar Panels Market : Global Industry Analysis, Dev

    By satyamspot, Created on: 08/10/2015, Last updated on: 08/10/2015

    » Solar photovoltaic (PV) panels are used widely as an eco-friendly and renewal energy based power generation technology around the world. Floating type solar photovoltaic panels have numerous advantages compare to conventional solar panels, including convenient, and energy efficiency, according to...

    • 0 replies, 298 views

    PR news / Promotions / Events

    Chevrolet to Launch New Cruze at upcoming Bangkok Motor Show

    By prnews, Created on: 21/03/2013, Last updated on: 21/03/2013

    » • 1.8-litre variant is now E85-capable, in line with Chevrolet’s strategy to continue expanding alternative energy capabilities to its customers • New Cruze features new front and rear fascia with new interior trim and colors • Next generation GF6 six-speed automatic transmission provides...

    • 0 replies, 2,204 views

    Thai news stories

    Thai infrastructure

    By drake, Created on: 13/08/2010, Last updated on: 11/11/2013

    » [quote:31gxfa6m]by drake on Thu Aug 12, 2010 1:21 pm How about industrial infrastructure instead of govt. admin ? The ppl might get some real skills then. by Voice on Thu Aug 12, 2010 11:07 pm I do agree with you there drake Thailand need much of those infrastructure like railway and better motoway...

    • drake commented : [quote="prommee_NE":3e2x41d1]Talking of Solar Panels....I was chatting to a manufacturer of them (from raw materials) about five years ago on a hospital balcony in Udon Thani. He had moved his company from China to Khon Kaen because the workforce was much better in Thailand (not because it was cheaper!)...and was manufacturing very good solar panels...but only for export. The internal market was using an inferior quality panel manufactured somewhere else closer to BKK. (maybe he would say that but look it up and you will see the differences) The point I would like to make however, is that electricity as it is currently created in Thailand is so much cheaper than solar energy that solar has no chance of entering the main market on the same scale as (say) Germany. There are however other energy alternatives that are better suited to the physical and climatic conditions in Thailand. Biomass is one such resource that has been experimented with on a small scale...but could be used in many villages and make them more self-sufficient...especially if the machinery included the production of compost. There are machines that have been designed in Denmark and possibly elsewhere that are ideal for village use...that are much cheaper than the solar panels provided as Government grants to places without electricity (or were provided in a former pre-coup era)...they rely on ready available current waste products with the addition of a small area of easily grown fuel. It would of course remove a source of income from the Electricity Providers...but would help the village communities and Thailand in general tremendously.[/quote:3e2x41d1] Regarding PV/Solar Electric. The basic technology to manufacture the solar cell is the same as for other semiconductor devices but simpler. IF someone were to start up a fab (semiconductor foundry) then it can be a stepping stone to more complex product(s). As far as I know, there is no semiconductor foundry of any kind in Thailand (someone correct me, please) By any chance you recall the name of this Chinese company in KhonKaen ? Whereas the cost of electricity is a little cheaper in Thailand than in Europe/US, there is a huge amount of government subsidy in PV and non-fossil fuel based energy and hence the popularity there. Where many electricity generating entities in Europe and US are 'for profit' private corporation,in Thiland, EGAT would be very happy to lose a few customers because they are quite overloaded the way it is. My real interest on the topic isn't about electric power generation but rather getting Thailand it's own semiconductor manufacturing capability and PV cell foundry is a good stepping stone. Biomass, that's a different animal. Depending on what it is, one either burn it directly in a high temperature furnace or convert it in to some other fuel (eg. methanol, ethanol, methane, bio-diesel) Except for bio-diesel, the process is a little more complicated/tedious and not that suitable for deployment in small ville. There is no single ideal solution for localized renewable electric generation, every location is unique and the solution must be optimized for each location.

    • Christian9 commented : [quote="drake":av3lyv6h][quote="prommee_NE":av3lyv6h][u:av3lyv6h]Talking of [url=http://www.shinesolar.net:av3lyv6h][color=#000000:av3lyv6h]solar panel[/color:av3lyv6h][/url:av3lyv6h]....I was chatting to a manufacturer of them (from raw materials) about five years ago on a hospital balcony in Udon Thani. He had moved his company from China to Khon Kaen because the workforce was much better in Thailand (not because it was cheaper!)...and was manufacturing very good solar panels...but only for export. The internal market was using an inferior quality panel manufactured somewhere else closer to BKK. (maybe he would say that but look it up and you will see the differences) The point I would like to make however, is that electricity as it is currently created in Thailand is so much cheaper than solar energy that solar has no chance of entering the main market on the same scale as (say) Germany. There are however other energy alternatives that are better suited to the physical and climatic conditions in Thailand. Biomass is one such resource that has been experimented with on a small scale...but could be used in many villages and make them more self-sufficient...especially if the machinery included the production of compost. There are machines that have been designed in Denmark and possibly elsewhere that are ideal for village use...that are much cheaper than the solar panels provided as Government grants to places without electricity (or were provided in a former pre-coup era)...they rely on ready available current waste products with the addition of a small area of easily grown fuel. It would of course remove a source of income from the Electricity Providers...but would help the village communities and Thailand in general tremendously.[/quote:av3lyv6h] Regarding PV/Solar Electric. The basic technology to manufacture the solar cell is the same as for other semiconductor devices but simpler. IF someone were to start up a fab (semiconductor foundry) then it can be a stepping stone to more complex product(s). As far as I know, there is no semiconductor foundry of any kind in Thailand (someone correct me, please) By any chance you recall the name of this Chinese company in KhonKaen ? Whereas the cost of electricity is a little cheaper in Thailand than in Europe/US, there is a huge amount of government subsidy in PV and non-fossil fuel based energy and hence the popularity there. Where many electricity generating entities in Europe and US are 'for profit' private corporation,in Thiland, EGAT would be very happy to lose a few customers because they are quite overloaded the way it is. My real interest on the topic isn't about electric power generation but rather getting Thailand it's own semiconductor manufacturing capability and PV cell foundry is a good stepping stone. Biomass, that's a different animal. Depending on what it is, one either burn it directly in a high temperature furnace or convert it in to some other fuel (eg. methanol, ethanol, methane, bio-diesel) Except for bio-diesel, the process is a little more complicated/tedious and not that suitable for deployment in small ville. There is no single ideal solution for localized renewable electric generation, every location is unique and the solution must be optimized for each location.[/u:av3lyv6h] [/quote:av3lyv6h] Yes there is no other way of generating clean and renewable electricity.. I have got solar panels for my home roof and got good some results.

    • 24 replies, 34,169 views

    Thai environment, energy, safety issues

    Nuclear Power for Thailand

    By Anonymous, Created on: 04/09/2007, Last updated on: 09/07/2014

    » The Prime Minister has explained the plan for a nuclear power plant to produce energy for Thailand and help Thailand move away from reliance on oil and gas. Thailand is a net importer of energy, getting much of its energy from the middle east at a huge cost to the country. Added to that the use of...

    • Anonymous commented : unter act the dependencies on fossil fuels, however, to consider nuclear energy as an alternative at this point simply is not prudent. I believe that nuclear energy in today’s global economy is based on the premise of tiers of effective energy management. Thailand should take this opportunity to develop programs that exhibit successful energy strategies in stages with comprehensive benchmarks to lay a framework for future more advanced forms of energy.

    • Anonymous commented : 039;s high reliance on costly fossil fuels, limited availability of renewable energy, and global climate-change concerns. The government is now looking for a public-relations agency to carry out a public education plan to promote understanding of nuclear power. Most renewable energy has much higher production costs compared to nuclear power, which costs about two baht a kilowatt/hour (unit) to generate, compared with 5.5 baht a unit for wind power, 10.5 baht for solar, and 4.50 baht for biogas. Dr Piyasvasti said the study group was prepared to abandon its work if studies showed that other fuels would be cheaper than nuclear. One approach with high potential is believed to be integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), a new technology that turns coal into gas, but it could take two decades to develop on a commercial scale. Dr Piyasvasti's term as energy minister has also been marked by vigorous promotion of alternative fuels through a power demand-side management programme, providing soft loans and subsidies for energy-saving systems.

    • Wizard commented : to reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, and the global warming and public health risks that result from their use. I wish that all Governments of this World would Try to take onboard for the benefits of the Country they serve and stride in new paths of Renewable HP Steam producing Generation investments. Three different types of power plants - dry steam, flash, and binary - are used to generate electricity from geothermal energy, depending on temperature, depth, and quality of the water and steam in the area. In all cases the condensed steam and remaining geothermal fluid is injected back into the ground to pick up more heat. In some locations, the natural supply of water producing steam from the hot underground magma deposits has been exhausted and processed waste water is injected to replenish the supply. Most geothermal fields have more fluid recharge than heat, so re-injection can cool the resource, unless it is carefully managed. Dry Steam Power A dry steam power plant uses dry steam, typically above 235°C (455°F), to directly power its turbines. Dry steam is steam that contains no water droplets. All of the molecules are in a gaseous, as opposed to liquid, state. Dry steam plants are used where there is plenty of steam available that is not mixed with water. This is the oldest type of geothermal power plant and is still in use today. Dry steam plants are the simplest and most economical of geothermal plants. However, they emit small amounts of excess steam and gases. The geothermal plants at The Green land Geysers are dry steam plants. Flash steam Flash steam power use hot water above 182 °C (360 °F) from geothermal reservoirs. The high pressure underground keeps the water in the liquid state, although it is well above the boiling point of water at normal sea level atmospheric pressure. As the water is pumped from the reservoir to the power plant, the drop in pressure causes the water to convert, or "flash", into steam to power the turbine and or generators. Any water not flashed into steam is injected back into the reservoir for reuse. Flash steam plants, like dry steam plants, emit small amounts of gases and steam. Flash steam plants are the most common type of geothermal power generation plants in operation today. Binary-cycle The water used in binary-cycle power plants is cooler than that of flash steam plants, from 107 to 182 °C (225-360 °F). The hot fluid from geothermal reservoirs is passed through a heat exchanger which transfers heat to a separate pipe containing fluids with a much lower boiling point. These fluids, usually Iso-butane or Iso-pentane, are vaporized to power the turbine. The advantage to binary-cycle power plants is their lower cost and increased efficiency. These plants also do not emit any excess gas and, because they use fluids with a lower boiling point than water, are able to utilize lower temperature reservoirs, which are much more common. Most geothermal power plants planned for construction are binary-cycle. Main Advantages Geothermal energy offers a number of advantages over traditional fossil fuel based sources. From an environmental standpoint, the energy harnessed is clean and safe for the surrounding environment. It is also sustainable because the hot water used in the geothermal process can be re-injected into the ground to produce more steam. In addition, geothermal power plants are unaffected by changing weather conditions. Geothermal power plants work continually, day and night, making them. a fantastic proposition to investors and from an economic view, geothermal energy is extremely price competitive in some areas and reduces reliance on fossil fuels and their inherent price unpredictability. It also offers a degree of scalability: a large geothermal plant can power entire cities while smaller power plants can supply more remote sites such as rural villages. The SPGAsia Concept is to use the old wellhead Platforms and Refurbish the old well bore hole with Heat resistance liner and introduce Topside Control in its Harness and Steam Process insure the safety of the sea water returns back to the Sea clean and Risk free. Typical costs are 400M/700M for each Plant offshore Gary B Edwards Managing Director Member International Geo Thermal Consultants Subsea Power Group Asia Co.,Ltd

    • 25 replies, 35,706 views

    Thai environment, energy, safety issues

    Solar Power

    By Anonymous, Created on: 29/03/2005, Last updated on: 31/03/2015

    » I dont understand why Thailand is not using the sun which is there 365 days/year. Can anybody tell me ? I am in the process of building a house but when it comes to solar energy i might have to import myself to only then be confronted with a high import tax on such products. And that while closing...

    • Anonymous commented : The issue of solar power often overlooks a critical problem. In order to scale conventional PV cells to any realistically meaningful level (enough that you could even begin to replace a small fraction of Thailand's fossil fuel dependency) you would have to increase output by 10,000 to 100,000 times...and that would only make a small dent. Solar power is such a small industry and oil and gas are so large, that to make a meaningful contribution you have to grow the industry by a completely unreasonable amount. It simply can't be done. Silicon wafers for solar cells are a by product of commercial chip production. The rejects that aren't good enough to make computer chips (or that can't be otherwise sold) are used for PV cells. That is the only reason PV cells are even marginally cost effective. You simply can not scale this. The waste stream isn't there to do it. You could spend decades building new fabs to make silicon wafers for PV cells, but that would A) take decades, B) make them alot more expensive than they are now, as you would now be using primary silicon instead of a waste stream of rejected silicon. There is only 1 solar technology that can be scaled up rapidly, and that is biomass. Biomass is natures own solar energy system, and it doesn't require expensive infrastructure and factories to scale. Anyone can do it and on a large scale if necessary. It is an ideal solution for Thailand. This also means no Thai politician will support it, because there is no expensive factory where they can collect corruption payments. To get the energy out of biomass, you need a gasifier connected to a generator. This is a simple technology which can be readily understood and adopted by every mechanic in Thailand. You don't need an expensive investment. I cringe whenever I see people concentrating on solar power from PV cells. Peak oil is here today and we can't afford wasting time on this. If we want to make a meaningful contribution to a renewable energy future, biomass is the only thing that will work. It can be scaled up massively, immediately, and at a fraction of the cost of PV cells. If you want to be energy independent, buy yourself several rai of land, plant fast growing trees, buy a commercial gasifier from India (because nobody in Thailand makes them), connect it to your generator, and you have a cheap and effective energy source. It is always available, and you can grow it as necessary without worrying about importing expensive PV cells. True, you will have to harvest and chip the wood every day, but lets be realistic, you need the excercise anyway. This is the best solar power solution available today. And the most reliable.

    • Anonymous commented : rategy to moving us away from fossil fuels, without having to fire a lot of miners overnight. We must move now - inertia is not an option, and countries like Australia (and Thailand for that matter) are well-placed to take advantage of the blessing of their environments to get the ball rolling. Let's act now!! Kind regards David

    • 58 replies, 163,778 views

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