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  • LIFESTYLE

    Sometimes transcendental, always relevant

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 25/05/2018

    » The American films were on short supply this year at Cannes -- which in turn deprived the assembly line of red carpet material -- but nobody seemed to mind that except, well, some American media and fashion bloggers. That superfluous caveat aside, the recently wrapped 71st Cannes Film Festival was nearly unanimously praised as one of the best editions in recent memory, with a string of good, sometimes very good, titles playing night after night -- and even the bad films weren't so offensively bad, as was often the case. In the midst of soul-searching following the question of relevance (the world wants Avengers), the rise of streaming (the world watches films on phones), the decline of arthouse popularity, Cannes insists on the sacredness of cinema, on the future of the art, and this year it paid off solidly.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Hoping to take the top prize East

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 16/05/2018

    » Asian filmmakers have so far fielded a strong force at the 71st Cannes Film Festival, and when the Palme d'Or is decided on Saturday by the Cate Blanchett-led jury there's a real chance that the top prize might go to one of the Asian titles -- after a Turkish film in 2014 (Winter Sleep) and a Thai film back in 2010 (Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives).

  • NEWS

    The Cannes spectacle begins

    Life, Published on 08/05/2018

    » The 71st Cannes Film Festival opens tonight and for the next 10 days its red-carpet glitz, cinematic debates and potential controversies will dominate the news cycle -- exhaust it, to be precise. While security was a talking point last year, the world's largest movie event in 2018 has already invoked discussion through several structural changes -- from moving the opening to Tuesday instead of Wednesday, the revamp of the press screening schedule that has never changed for decades, and notably the selection of films that hints at Cannes' readiness to become less predictable.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Cannes you see it?

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 01/01/2016

    » With Ingrid Bergman gazing from the poster, the 68th Cannes Film Festival opens tonight, carrying the usual weight of the world's premier battleground of cinema as art, commerce and glamour.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Leaving a Thai impression

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 01/01/2016

    » Once again, a small Thai film blew over Cannes Film Festival like a graceful lover. On Monday, Apichatpong Weerasethakul's Cemetery Of Splendour (or Rak Ti Khon Kaen) was screened to a thundering 10-minute standing ovation in the Un Certain Regard section, where the film's elegant formalism and aching beauty, deeply rooted in the northeastern spirit and post-coup reflection, shook up the festival slumber.

  • LIFESTYLE

    Chinese hegemony

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 01/01/2016

    » A gloomy assassin prowls the breathtaking fields of the Tang-era kingdom, while China's awkward march to become a 21st century world power stirs the emotional core of its people. The two Chinese-language films — Mountains May Depart from the mainland, The Assassin from Taiwan — let us savour two distinct sensibilities in the main competition as the world's largest movie showcase rounds its last bend. The awards will be announced on Sunday night, and the two films seem to have a decent chance of winning prizes, either big or small, in a year when the majority of the top-tier line-up leaves much to be desired. 

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