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  • News & article

    Souped up broth best served hot

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 27/12/2015

    » When you eat a meal in China, there will probably be an array of different dishes on the table. One thing that can never be missing, however, is some kind of dish with a broth. Here, you have to be careful to avoid being scalded. Dishes hot from the stove usually have steam rising up from them, but the broth in Chinese dishes gives no such warning. These foods appear cool and harmless, but if you aren't careful you'll leave the table with your tongue fully cooked.

  • News & article

    The charm of enamelware

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 15/04/2018

    » In a trend-driven world, enamelware remains a classic.

  • News & article

    One size does not fit all

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 04/03/2018

    » Twenty years ago, people would get excited when a western newspaper praised Thai food as a new sensation. Foreign tourists visiting Thailand were very much impressed by what they ate here. The number of Thai restaurants overseas sharply increased, signaling the newfound popularity of our cuisine.

  • News & article

    The oodles of takes on noodles

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 02/04/2017

    » In their most popular forms kuay tio -- rice noodles -- are prepared in two ways. As kuay tio nam they are served in broth, and there are countless variants on this basic noodle soup. The other approach is to stir-fry the noodles in a wok to make phat kuay tio, and here again there is a long list of different fried noodles no less irresistible to noodle lovers as the repertoire of kuay tio nam.

  • News & article

    Dishing on noodles

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 29/01/2017

    » It might just be chauvinism on my part, and perhaps I just have it wrong, but I have the impression that Thailand has more noodle dishes than any other country. For starters, there are kuay tio luuk chin plaa (rice noodles with balls of pounded fish meat), ba-mee muu daeng or pet yang (wheat noodles with Chinese red pork or grilled duck meat), kuay tio ruea (rice "boat noodles"), kuay tio nuea (rice noodles with beef), kuai tio khae (Hakka style), kuay tio kaeng (also known as kuay tio khaek, in curried coconut cream sauce) and kuay tio kai mara (with chicken and bitter melon).

  • News & article

    A culinary melting pot

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 28/08/2016

    » Think of a favourite dish and then consider the various ingredients that come together to make it. You'll see that they are drawn from many different sources, some of them borrowed from other culinary traditions. One good example is pad Thai. Almost everything that goes into it is Chinese, from the small-gauge rice noodles to the tofu, beansprouts, hua chai po (Chinese turnip), Chinese leeks, dried shrimp, peanuts and even the duck eggs (in the past, ducks in Thailand were raised by Chinese). In terms of its ingredients, this familiar dish is Chinese from top to bottom, although whether it was a Thai or a Chinese cook who first prepared it, I don't know.

  • News & article

    Gone but not forgotten

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 07/08/2016

    » Many old Thai dishes that were familiar to people of a few generations ago are gone now, but among the old dishes, a number have been revived and are appearing on menus again. In many cases there have been revisions and adaptations, however, with new ingredients introduced as substitutes for original ones that are hard to find now, or that may no longer be available at all.

  • News & article

    Having enough on your plate

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 14/08/2016

    » By the term "one-dish meal", most people mean a meal where a single plateful will fill them up. But using satiety as the basis if the definition doesn't really work, because people have different capacities. Some eat very little, while others prefer a big meal. For example, some food shop customers might not feel full after finishing off a plate of pork fried rice and order a plate of kui tiao sen yai raad naa (broad rice noodles with meat in gravy) as a follow up, or start off with pork noodles and then move on to a bowl of yen ta fo. Both examples show that it takes a combination of these dishes to fill up some members of the clientele, and that both cooked-to-order food shops and noodles shops will offer a variety of dishes.

  • News & article

    Wake up and smell the coffee

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 14/09/2014

    » There is no way to know how much coffee the people of Thailand drink in the course of a day. In the future, when the population grows even bigger, they are bound to consume even more. Thais and coffee are inseparably bound, and it isn't only the taste that has hooked them. One of the pleasures of Thai life is to meet up with friends in a coffee shop and relax over a steaming cupful.

  • News & article

    Tasty and versatile pork belly

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 17/08/2014

    » The three layers that give moo sam chan (three-layer pork, or pork belly) its name are the skin, the fat and the meat. They make up the largest cut of pork and the one used in the most recipes. But what are these recipes, and what do they taste like?

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