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  • News & article

    Dine in the New Year at Blue Elephant

    Life, Published on 26/12/2018

    » 2019 is around the corner and those wishing to have their last memorable meal of the year will have one more choice for their dinner plan when Blue Elephant will present a colourful, mouth-watering set menu at its Bangkok and Phuket restaurants on Dec 31.

  • News & article

    Souped up broth best served hot

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 27/12/2015

    » When you eat a meal in China, there will probably be an array of different dishes on the table. One thing that can never be missing, however, is some kind of dish with a broth. Here, you have to be careful to avoid being scalded. Dishes hot from the stove usually have steam rising up from them, but the broth in Chinese dishes gives no such warning. These foods appear cool and harmless, but if you aren't careful you'll leave the table with your tongue fully cooked.

  • News & article

    One size does not fit all

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 04/03/2018

    » Twenty years ago, people would get excited when a western newspaper praised Thai food as a new sensation. Foreign tourists visiting Thailand were very much impressed by what they ate here. The number of Thai restaurants overseas sharply increased, signaling the newfound popularity of our cuisine.

  • News & article

    The deep roots of phak boong

    Brunch, Published on 14/12/2014

    » The morning glory-like vine called phak boong might be the most commonplace of vegetables, cheap and so plentiful that you can find some kinds growing as weeds practically everywhere, but when brought into the kitchen of a good cook it can undergo a countless number of miraculous changes. It is indigenous to tropical Asian countries like Southern China, Laos, Myanmar, Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand, and has held its own against many invasive plants that have come into the region over the years, unchanged and unhybridised.

  • News & article

    Banh mi and bourbon

    Guru, Pornchai Sereemongkonpol, Published on 05/01/2018

    » The Setting: Not only Happy Endings, a new restaurant in Sala Daeng Soi 1, should pique your interest with its double entendre name (intentional or not) but also its contemporary take on Vietnamese cuisine. I climbed a green metal staircase, passing the restaurant's name spelt in handwritten lowercase with neon lights and opened a double-panel door to a casual space. Think bare ceiling with pipes running along it and exposed beams.

  • News & article

    It's all in the stars

    Life, Vanniya Sriangura, Published on 08/12/2017

    » Months of kitchen rumours, speculations from experts and chef anxieties are finally over.

  • News & article

    Street and savoury

    Guru, Eric E Surbano, Published on 04/08/2017

    » <b>The setting:</b> After being dubbed the world's street food capital for two years in a row by CNN, it seemed only proper that the first Michelin-starred street food restaurant, Hawker Chan, opened its doors to Bangkokians almost a month ago. Hailing from Singapore, this is the restaurant's second venture out of its home country, the first being Taiwan. The restaurant has opened in a pretty accessible location on the fifth floor of Terminal 21. Much like its original Singaporean location, it's not a stranger to long queues, but customer flow has definitely improved since they opened. Still, don't be surprised if all their tables are full during lunch and dinner, especially on weekends.

  • News & article

    The oodles of takes on noodles

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 02/04/2017

    » In their most popular forms kuay tio -- rice noodles -- are prepared in two ways. As kuay tio nam they are served in broth, and there are countless variants on this basic noodle soup. The other approach is to stir-fry the noodles in a wok to make phat kuay tio, and here again there is a long list of different fried noodles no less irresistible to noodle lovers as the repertoire of kuay tio nam.

  • News & article

    Dishing on noodles

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 29/01/2017

    » It might just be chauvinism on my part, and perhaps I just have it wrong, but I have the impression that Thailand has more noodle dishes than any other country. For starters, there are kuay tio luuk chin plaa (rice noodles with balls of pounded fish meat), ba-mee muu daeng or pet yang (wheat noodles with Chinese red pork or grilled duck meat), kuay tio ruea (rice "boat noodles"), kuay tio nuea (rice noodles with beef), kuai tio khae (Hakka style), kuay tio kaeng (also known as kuay tio khaek, in curried coconut cream sauce) and kuay tio kai mara (with chicken and bitter melon).

  • News & article

    A culinary melting pot

    Brunch, Suthon Sukphisit, Published on 28/08/2016

    » Think of a favourite dish and then consider the various ingredients that come together to make it. You'll see that they are drawn from many different sources, some of them borrowed from other culinary traditions. One good example is pad Thai. Almost everything that goes into it is Chinese, from the small-gauge rice noodles to the tofu, beansprouts, hua chai po (Chinese turnip), Chinese leeks, dried shrimp, peanuts and even the duck eggs (in the past, ducks in Thailand were raised by Chinese). In terms of its ingredients, this familiar dish is Chinese from top to bottom, although whether it was a Thai or a Chinese cook who first prepared it, I don't know.

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