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  • News & article

    Anwar Ibrahim is back in Bangkok

    Life, Published on 20/11/2018

    » The champion of reformasi (reform), a prisoner of more than 10 years and finally the prime minister-in-waiting of Malaysia, Anwar Ibrahim has charted the most remarkable political career the region has ever seen.

  • News & article

    Bang for a bookworm's baht

    Life, Published on 07/08/2014

    » The "Be Trend Read Town" fair offers discounted books at the Mall Bang Kapi, starting today and running until Aug 13.

  • News & article

    The way we were

    Life, Published on 23/11/2018

    » The history of Bangkok is fascinating. But the textbooks in history class or the stories told by our grandparents can only tell us so much. We need to take a closer look if we want an understanding of what life here was really like more than a century ago.

  • News & article

    Ravens' feast

    Life, Bernard Trink, Published on 27/12/2018

    » This reviewer's understanding of historical novels is that the authors do historical research on their topic, using actual figures and imaginary ones where need-be, to write essentially factual and hopefully interesting stories. But not all historical novelists follow this form. Some are more concerned about their own largely fictitious story than the actual events behind it.

  • News & article

    When literature becomes light

    Life, Kong Rithdee, Published on 23/07/2018

    » Haruki Murakami's books exert a strange pull that's earned him a devoted following around the world -- and Thailand is no exception. One foot planted in the reality of the modern world, the other trudging through a surreal dreamland as the ground beneath his characters' feet keeps shifting, Murakami entrances and confuses, lulls and hallucinates. His novels and short stories also occupy that exclusive territory in the literary world: he's a best-selling author who's also every bookmaker's favourite to win the Nobel Prize. He's also one of a few post-war Japanese writers whose style and substance transcend cultural and national boundaries.

  • News & article

    From Reading to Nakhon Nowhere

    Brunch, Alan Parkhouse, Published on 06/05/2018

    » For the past 39 years, Roger Crutchley's weekly Postscript column has kept Bangkok Post readers smiling, taking a light-hearted look at life through the eyes of a long-time expat as well as being a welcome respite from the regular angst of crime, local politics, demonstrations and coups that often filled the rest of the paper.

  • News & article

    Dan Brown with a Thai voice

    Life, Melalin Mahavongtrakul, Published on 05/03/2018

    » The Thai award-winning detective novel Kaholmahoratuek is that rare breed: a page-turner set in the 1940s that mixes poetry, history, murder and revenge. The book's appeal also lies with the writer's use of genre elements -- serial murders, cryptic clues and detective work -- in the vintage setting of old Bangkok where century-old temples, back alleys and local communities become grisly crime scenes.

  • News & article

    Turning cheeks and pages

    Life, Chris Baker, Published on 06/09/2018

    » Egyptian mummies who come to life as sexy nymphets. Thai princes driving fast cars. A Thai superwoman who casually murders several husbands. Starlets touting breast-enhancement techniques. For a book about "nationalism and identity in modern Thai literature", this volume has a few surprises.

  • News & article

    Taking the long view

    Life, Sawarin Suwichakornpong, Published on 19/10/2017

    » In Greek mythology, Mnemosyne is the goddess of memory. Impregnated by Zeus, she gave birth to the nine muses with whom artists, poets, musicians, writers and historians are familiar. As a daughter of Uranus, Mnemosyne is also a goddess of time; she provides the role of rote memorisation and invents language and words where her daughters, the muses, pick up and render them. She is a goddess that makes memory alive and is often acquainted with vivid remembrance.

  • News & article

    Isis destroyed

    Life, Bernard Trink, Published on 06/09/2018

    » As most of the hijackers responsible for the 9/11 outrage were Saudi Arabian, it stands to reason that the US would take the kingdom to task. Instead, Washington turned its ire on Afghanistan and Iraq. How could that be? In fact, it made sense. America is Saudi's biggest oil customer and didn't want it to stop flowing, the more than 3,000 dead at New York's Twin Towers notwithstanding.

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